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New varieties of food legumes for East Georgia dry lands

By: Urshadze, T | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT) | Tbilisi (Georgia) 14-17 Jun 2004.
Contributor(s): Bedoshvili, D [ed.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Tbilisi (Georgia) CIMMYT : 2004Description: p. 408.Subject(s): Chickpeas | Dry farming | Faba beans AGROVOC | Georgia | Germplasm | Legumes AGROVOC | Lentils | Protein content | Wheat | Yield factors | CIMMYT | Food securityDDC classification: 633.1147 Summary: One of the most important tasks outlined in the Food Security Program of Georgia is attributed to the provision of the population with plant proteins, produced in dryland areas of East Georgia. From the ancient times, the sources of such proteins in our country were grain legumes such as chickpea, lentil, faba beans, and since more recent time - haricot and soybeans. These crops provided staple food for Georgians and other peoples residing on our country. A quarter of the arable dry lands (238000 ha) in the East Georgia has deteriorated, mainly due to cultivation of wheat monoculture, abandonment, water and wind erosion, lack of amelioration and crop rotations, pesticides and fertilizers and improved, drought tolerant varieties. Traditionally, Georgian farmer used the abovementioned ~in legumes in rotation with winter wheat in East Georgia, which were well adapted to variable weather, precipitations, frost and other unfavorable climatic factors and produced almost always stable yield. New varieties of chickpea end lentil were elaborated and patented in collaboration with of the group of the soil scientists from Georgia Agrarian State University (GASU). During the recent several years high yields of legume grains were obtained by the local farmers by growing improved varieties in the drylands of Gurjaani and Dedoplitskaro districts (average precipitation 620 mm): 2.6 t/ha and 1.8 t/ha, for chickpea (variety-Zedazeni) and lentils (variety- Shiraki) respectively. It should be emphasized that advantage of the improved varieties was so apparent and significant that they gained great popularity among other farmers. The other advantage of the new varieties is earliness, which does not affect the productivity, but makes them suitable for using as second or intermediary crops, and obtain additional yield of grain or green mass. International cooperation among the soil scientists and agronomists must be established in the nearest future to exchange the results of research. A successful germplasm enhancement effort requires the development of an international research infrastructure with participation of European countries, including Georgia. The opportunities of interaction supported by IPGRI are invaluable in developing of long-term collaboration in effective application of the classical and modem techniques to germplasm improvement in grain legumes. This will become a foundation for successful implementation of the Food Security Program of Georgia.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.1147 BED (Browse shelf) 1 Available 6W630072
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Abstract only

One of the most important tasks outlined in the Food Security Program of Georgia is attributed to the provision of the population with plant proteins, produced in dryland areas of East Georgia. From the ancient times, the sources of such proteins in our country were grain legumes such as chickpea, lentil, faba beans, and since more recent time - haricot and soybeans. These crops provided staple food for Georgians and other peoples residing on our country. A quarter of the arable dry lands (238000 ha) in the East Georgia has deteriorated, mainly due to cultivation of wheat monoculture, abandonment, water and wind erosion, lack of amelioration and crop rotations, pesticides and fertilizers and improved, drought tolerant varieties. Traditionally, Georgian farmer used the abovementioned ~in legumes in rotation with winter wheat in East Georgia, which were well adapted to variable weather, precipitations, frost and other unfavorable climatic factors and produced almost always stable yield. New varieties of chickpea end lentil were elaborated and patented in collaboration with of the group of the soil scientists from Georgia Agrarian State University (GASU). During the recent several years high yields of legume grains were obtained by the local farmers by growing improved varieties in the drylands of Gurjaani and Dedoplitskaro districts (average precipitation 620 mm): 2.6 t/ha and 1.8 t/ha, for chickpea (variety-Zedazeni) and lentils (variety- Shiraki) respectively. It should be emphasized that advantage of the improved varieties was so apparent and significant that they gained great popularity among other farmers. The other advantage of the new varieties is earliness, which does not affect the productivity, but makes them suitable for using as second or intermediary crops, and obtain additional yield of grain or green mass. International cooperation among the soil scientists and agronomists must be established in the nearest future to exchange the results of research. A successful germplasm enhancement effort requires the development of an international research infrastructure with participation of European countries, including Georgia. The opportunities of interaction supported by IPGRI are invaluable in developing of long-term collaboration in effective application of the classical and modem techniques to germplasm improvement in grain legumes. This will become a foundation for successful implementation of the Food Security Program of Georgia.

English

0409|AGRIS 0401|AL-Wheat Program

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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