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Glimpsing the future by looking back: Abiotic stress tolerance in maize

By: Edmeades, G.O.
Contributor(s): Narro, L.A [coaut.] | Schussler, J [coaut.] | Tarakegne, A [coaut.] | Zaidi, P.H.|Babu, R.|Cairns, J.|Jeffers, D.|Kha, L.Q.|Krishna, G.K.|Krishna, V.|McDonald, A.|Ortiz-Ferrara, G.|Palacios, N.|Pixley, K.|Prasanna, B.M.|Rashid, Z.|Tefera, T.|Tiwari, T.P.|Vinayan, M.T.|Vengadessan, V.|Xingming, F.|Xu, Y.|Weidong. C.|Zhang, S.|Vivek, B.S | Mugo, S.N [coaut.] | Makumbi, D | Cairns, J.E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 2011Description: p. 11-12.Summary: Climatic and demographic changes are resulting in maize growing environments that are increasingly dry and hot, or exposed to acute N deficiency and soil acidity. Resource poor farmers in the tropics, unable to access irrigation, fertilizer and lime are forced to rely primarily on genetic solutions to abiotic stress. In temperate areas energy costs may limit access to irrigation and N fertilizer, while physical supply threatens P and K supplies. The efficiency with which these resources are used merits research attention. Pressure on land resources in Asia is already high and growing, so yield potential cannot be sacrificed in pursuit of stress tolerance and resource use efficiency. We review the considerable progress that has been made in stress tolerance in maize. Lessons from the past can inform future efforts, while new genomic selection tools, phenotyping protocols and agronomic management methods show considerable promise for speeding future gains in productivity.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-6419 (Browse shelf) Available
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Climatic and demographic changes are resulting in maize growing environments that are increasingly dry and hot, or exposed to acute N deficiency and soil acidity. Resource poor farmers in the tropics, unable to access irrigation, fertilizer and lime are forced to rely primarily on genetic solutions to abiotic stress. In temperate areas energy costs may limit access to irrigation and N fertilizer, while physical supply threatens P and K supplies. The efficiency with which these resources are used merits research attention. Pressure on land resources in Asia is already high and growing, so yield potential cannot be sacrificed in pursuit of stress tolerance and resource use efficiency. We review the considerable progress that has been made in stress tolerance in maize. Lessons from the past can inform future efforts, while new genomic selection tools, phenotyping protocols and agronomic management methods show considerable promise for speeding future gains in productivity.

Global Maize Program

English

Lucia Segura

INT2948|INT2460|INT2765|INT2062

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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