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Screening of kenyan maize germplasm for tolerance to low pH and aluminium for use in acid soils of Kenya

By: Gudu, S | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT) Kenya | 7. Proceedings of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Maize Conference Nairobi (Kenya) 5-11 Feb 2002.
Contributor(s): Friesen, D.K.|Palmer, A.F.E [eds.] | Ligeyo, D.O [coaut.] | Maina, S.M [coaut.] | Ombakho, G [coaut.] | Onkware, A.O [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Nairobi (Kenya) KARI|CIMMYT : 2002Description: p. 216-221.ISBN: 970-648-120-6.Subject(s): Acid soils | Crop husbandry | Germplasm | Kenya | Maize | Seed production | Tropical soils | CIMMYT | KARI | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOCDDC classification: 338.16 Summary: Low soil pH is a major constraint to maize (Zea mays L.) production on tropical soils due to toxic levels of aluminium (Al) and the concomitant phosphorus (P) deficiency that hinders plant root growth. A preliminary laboratory screening was conducted to test 75 Kenyan landrace maize accessions and J 2 commercial varieties for response to low soil pH and Al toxicity in solution culture. The landrace maize accessions were screened under different levels of Al concentration (0, 100, 200, and 300 mM) at pH 4.0. A standard acid-tolerant variety (CIMCALI 97 Balopia SA4 subsequently referred to as 97BASA4) and an Al-sensitive variety (CIMCALI 97BSA3-1) from CIMMYT were included as controls. Preliminary classification of the 75 randomly chosen landrace accessions into tolerant/sensitive phenotypic classes was based on the FRL, Rti and haematoxylin staining of seedling grown in a solution culture containing 200 mM Al at pH 4.0, but the final screening of commercial hybrids/synthetics/composites was done in similar medium at 220 mM Al. The most consistently tolerant accessions based on FRL and Rti were, 1X1 , 5A, 203B, and 4D, and the most consistently sensitve accessions were 306A, 306B and 7B2, while the rest of landrace accessions had intermediate tolerance or sensitivity when compared with 97BASA4 and 97BSA3-1. Interesting observations were made when four selected tolerant landrace accessions (203B, SA, 4D and 1X1) and two susceptible accessions (306A and 306B) were tested against 13 commercial hybrids, synthetics and composites at 220 mM Al. The most tolerant commercial varieties were DH02 and HS13 while the most sensitive were H623 and H62S and the rest were of intermediate tolerance or sensitivity. It is interesting to note that some of tl1e commercial varieties and landrace accessions were sensitive to Al concentrations as low as 140 mM typically found in some high potential maize producing areas of Kenya indicating that Al toxicity could be one of the major causes for the low maize yields in acid soils of Kenya. Secondly, there is high variability in tolerance to Al toxicity among Kenyan commercial varieties and landrace maize populations that may be useful in selection for A1-tolerant materials for use in acid soils in Kenya..Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 338.16 FRI (Browse shelf) 1 Available U630188
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Low soil pH is a major constraint to maize (Zea mays L.) production on tropical soils due to toxic levels of aluminium (Al) and the concomitant phosphorus (P) deficiency that hinders plant root growth. A preliminary laboratory screening was conducted to test 75 Kenyan landrace maize accessions and J 2 commercial varieties for response to low soil pH and Al toxicity in solution culture. The landrace maize accessions were screened under different levels of Al concentration (0, 100, 200, and 300 mM) at pH 4.0. A standard acid-tolerant variety (CIMCALI 97 Balopia SA4 subsequently referred to as 97BASA4) and an Al-sensitive variety (CIMCALI 97BSA3-1) from CIMMYT were included as controls. Preliminary classification of the 75 randomly chosen landrace accessions into tolerant/sensitive phenotypic classes was based on the FRL, Rti and haematoxylin staining of seedling grown in a solution culture containing 200 mM Al at pH 4.0, but the final screening of commercial hybrids/synthetics/composites was done in similar medium at 220 mM Al. The most consistently tolerant accessions based on FRL and Rti were, 1X1 , 5A, 203B, and 4D, and the most consistently sensitve accessions were 306A, 306B and 7B2, while the rest of landrace accessions had intermediate tolerance or sensitivity when compared with 97BASA4 and 97BSA3-1. Interesting observations were made when four selected tolerant landrace accessions (203B, SA, 4D and 1X1) and two susceptible accessions (306A and 306B) were tested against 13 commercial hybrids, synthetics and composites at 220 mM Al. The most tolerant commercial varieties were DH02 and HS13 while the most sensitive were H623 and H62S and the rest were of intermediate tolerance or sensitivity. It is interesting to note that some of tl1e commercial varieties and landrace accessions were sensitive to Al concentrations as low as 140 mM typically found in some high potential maize producing areas of Kenya indicating that Al toxicity could be one of the major causes for the low maize yields in acid soils of Kenya. Secondly, there is high variability in tolerance to Al toxicity among Kenyan commercial varieties and landrace maize populations that may be useful in selection for A1-tolerant materials for use in acid soils in Kenya..

English

0410|AGRIS 0401|AL-Maize Program

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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