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Recent advances in CIMMYT's highland maize program

By: Beck, D.L | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico) | Arnel R. Hallauer International Symposium on Plant Breeding Mexico, DF (Mexico) 17-22 Aug 2003.
Contributor(s): Torres, J.L [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 2003Description: p. 206-207.ISBN: 970-648-106-0.Subject(s): Developing Countries | Environmental factors | Food crops | Germplasm conservation | Highlands | Maize | Mexico | Puccinia sorghi | Genotypes AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOC | Plant breeding AGROVOCSummary: Many farmers in developing countries do not replace their seed annually with newly purchased commercial seed. Instead they rely on recyded seed saved from their own harvest or obtained from other farmers. Smale and Phiri (1998) recommended that maize breeders working for areas where farmers commonly recyde seed should consider inbreeding depression as a criteria in their hybrid releases. Highland maize is grown on about 6 million hectares worldwide with almost 3 million hectares in Mexico (Beck 2001). In Mexican highland areas, only about 10% of the area is planted with improved hybrid cultivars. It is a common practice for farmers in these areas to recyde their seed. Average maize yields in the Mexican highlands are about 2.5 t/ha. Yields are constrained by various factors including drought, low soil fertility, hail, and lack of availability of improved seed at accessible prices. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the inbreeding depression in various highland hybrid types by comparing the F1 to the F2 and F3 generations under both low soil nitrogen and non-stressed conditions.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-3853 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 632548
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Many farmers in developing countries do not replace their seed annually with newly purchased commercial seed. Instead they rely on recyded seed saved from their own harvest or obtained from other farmers. Smale and Phiri (1998) recommended that maize breeders working for areas where farmers commonly recyde seed should consider inbreeding depression as a criteria in their hybrid releases. Highland maize is grown on about 6 million hectares worldwide with almost 3 million hectares in Mexico (Beck 2001). In Mexican highland areas, only about 10% of the area is planted with improved hybrid cultivars. It is a common practice for farmers in these areas to recyde their seed. Average maize yields in the Mexican highlands are about 2.5 t/ha. Yields are constrained by various factors including drought, low soil fertility, hail, and lack of availability of improved seed at accessible prices. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the inbreeding depression in various highland hybrid types by comparing the F1 to the F2 and F3 generations under both low soil nitrogen and non-stressed conditions.

English

0311|AGRIS 0301|AL-Maize Program

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org