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Importance of and growing concerns for maize diseases in the asian region

By: Dalmacio, S.C | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico, DF (Mexico) | 7, Proceedings of the Asian Regional Maize Workshop Los Baños (Philippines) 23-27 Feb 1998.
Contributor(s): Vasal, S.K.|Gonzalez Ceniceros, F.|XiongMing, F [eds.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Los Baños, Laguna (Philippines) PCARRD : 2000Description: p. 267-276.Subject(s): Aspergillus | Bacterial diseases | Charcoal | Diplodia | Disease resistance | Dwarfs | Fertilizers | Fusarium | Maize | Mildews | Plant diseases | Rhizoctonia | Rusts | Seed production | Transgenic plants | Yields AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOCSummary: Corn diseases constitute important constraints to corn production in the Asian region. Of the reported corn diseases, the following may be considered of economic importance: maize dwarf mosaic (including sugar cane mosaic); the downy mildews; Diplodia, northern, southern, and banded leaf and sheath blights, southern and common rusts; Diplodia, Fusarium, charcoal and bacterial root and stalk rots; Rhizoctonia, Diplodia, Fusarium and Aspergillus kernel and ear rots; and common and head smuts. The importance of these diseases vary from country to country , locality to locality or season to season within a country , under the influence of cultural and cropping practices. The introduction and increase utilization of hybrid technology in many Asian countries in recent years bring forth greater potential for disease outbreaks as a consequence of increased plant population and fertilizer usage. Likewise, the increasing trend towards single cross hybrids would extend the disease prpblems to seed production areas where disease susceptible parent inbreds of commercially acceptable hybrids have to be grown. Disease occurrences will remain dynamic as in the past. While some of the currently important diseases may become le'8s important as resistant cultivars are developed, others presently considered not important may become more prevalent with changes in cropping practices and introduction of new, high yielding cultivars. Disease resistance will remain the most economical way of controlling corn diseases. Resistance is available to almost all the major diseases of corn and the big challenge to the breeders is to incorporate these genes into elite but susceptible cultivars. With recent developments in biotechnology, susceptible cultivars may be transformed with more precision into resistant ones using genes from various sources other than corn. Likewise, the use of transgenic corn carrying the resistance to certain insects like the Bt gene deserves consideration as it may also reduce attack of pathogens like stalk and ear rots that are commonly associated with insect damage. However, management of these resistance genes to prolong their effectiveness or slow down their breakdown, would require integration of other strategies, including the use of chemicals, biocontrol agents and cultural practices.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Corn diseases constitute important constraints to corn production in the Asian region. Of the reported corn diseases, the following may be considered of economic importance: maize dwarf mosaic (including sugar cane mosaic); the downy mildews; Diplodia, northern, southern, and banded leaf and sheath blights, southern and common rusts; Diplodia, Fusarium, charcoal and bacterial root and stalk rots; Rhizoctonia, Diplodia, Fusarium and Aspergillus kernel and ear rots; and common and head smuts. The importance of these diseases vary from country to country , locality to locality or season to season within a country , under the influence of cultural and cropping practices. The introduction and increase utilization of hybrid technology in many Asian countries in recent years bring forth greater potential for disease outbreaks as a consequence of increased plant population and fertilizer usage. Likewise, the increasing trend towards single cross hybrids would extend the disease prpblems to seed production areas where disease susceptible parent inbreds of commercially acceptable hybrids have to be grown. Disease occurrences will remain dynamic as in the past. While some of the currently important diseases may become le'8s important as resistant cultivars are developed, others presently considered not important may become more prevalent with changes in cropping practices and introduction of new, high yielding cultivars. Disease resistance will remain the most economical way of controlling corn diseases. Resistance is available to almost all the major diseases of corn and the big challenge to the breeders is to incorporate these genes into elite but susceptible cultivars. With recent developments in biotechnology, susceptible cultivars may be transformed with more precision into resistant ones using genes from various sources other than corn. Likewise, the use of transgenic corn carrying the resistance to certain insects like the Bt gene deserves consideration as it may also reduce attack of pathogens like stalk and ear rots that are commonly associated with insect damage. However, management of these resistance genes to prolong their effectiveness or slow down their breakdown, would require integration of other strategies, including the use of chemicals, biocontrol agents and cultural practices.

English

0208|AGRIS 0201|AL-Maize Program|R01PROCE

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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