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Maize hybrid development in Central America: Reliability of yield gains against a regional check

By: Córdova, H.S.
Contributor(s): Barreto, H.J [coaut.] | Crossa, J [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 1996Subject(s): Central America | Genetic stability | Maize | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOC In: Maydica v. 41, no. 4, p. 349-353634832Summary: In recent years considerable interest has been placed in developing and promoting the use of maize hybrids in most countries of Central America. There is compelling evidence indicating that maize hybrids with high yield potential and wide adaptability to different production environments are commercially available. The extensive use of these genotypes is playing an important role in increasing overall yield production even in the highly variable environments found on the hillsides of Central America. In this paper we analyzed the performance of maize (Zea Mays L.) hybrids in Central America using data from 51 uniform trials conducted between 1988 and 1990. Cultivars included in this study were HB83, HB85, H30, HA46, Dekalb B833, Pioneer XLH53, HR17, MAX307, H33 and TACSA 203, all of which have demonstrated improved average response against H5, a hybrid introduced in the 1960s that is grown extensively in the region. Reliability of response (RN(i) or probability of normalized response greater than zero) of the superior cultivars was calculated using Hi as a check. Reliability of superior hybrids was classified into three classes with respect to the check cultivar (1-15). The selection of a control cultivar emerges from the need to provide both the breeder and the farmer with a common term of reference to compare new genotypes; therefore, it is desirable for such a genotype to have consistent performance and acceptable yield level. Stable genotypes showed linear regression slopes between yield differences (Y-1-Y-H5) against the environment mean (average yield level of a given trial) that do not differ significantly from zero (P <0.05) and have RNi >0.7 with respect to H5. Genotypes HB85 and HB83 showed consistent performance across sites as well as high yield potential, therefore both should be considered as regional controls. Yield stability of both hybrids; over 3 years, was confirmed using reliability of response. It is concluded that more studies are needed to correlate the use of reliability with other methods in order to determine true stability in variable environmentsCollection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-4614 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 634832
Total holds: 0

Peer-review: Yes - Open Access: Yes|http://science.thomsonreuters.com/cgi-bin/jrnlst/jlresults.cgi?PC=MASTER&ISSN=0025-6153

In recent years considerable interest has been placed in developing and promoting the use of maize hybrids in most countries of Central America. There is compelling evidence indicating that maize hybrids with high yield potential and wide adaptability to different production environments are commercially available. The extensive use of these genotypes is playing an important role in increasing overall yield production even in the highly variable environments found on the hillsides of Central America. In this paper we analyzed the performance of maize (Zea Mays L.) hybrids in Central America using data from 51 uniform trials conducted between 1988 and 1990. Cultivars included in this study were HB83, HB85, H30, HA46, Dekalb B833, Pioneer XLH53, HR17, MAX307, H33 and TACSA 203, all of which have demonstrated improved average response against H5, a hybrid introduced in the 1960s that is grown extensively in the region. Reliability of response (RN(i) or probability of normalized response greater than zero) of the superior cultivars was calculated using Hi as a check. Reliability of superior hybrids was classified into three classes with respect to the check cultivar (1-15). The selection of a control cultivar emerges from the need to provide both the breeder and the farmer with a common term of reference to compare new genotypes; therefore, it is desirable for such a genotype to have consistent performance and acceptable yield level. Stable genotypes showed linear regression slopes between yield differences (Y-1-Y-H5) against the environment mean (average yield level of a given trial) that do not differ significantly from zero (P <0.05) and have RNi >0.7 with respect to H5. Genotypes HB85 and HB83 showed consistent performance across sites as well as high yield potential, therefore both should be considered as regional controls. Yield stability of both hybrids; over 3 years, was confirmed using reliability of response. It is concluded that more studies are needed to correlate the use of reliability with other methods in order to determine true stability in variable environments

Genetic Resources Program

English

9702|EE|R96ANALY|1

Lucia Segura

CCJL01

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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