000 nab a22 7a 4500
999 _c59296
_d59288
001 59296
003 MX-TxCIM
005 20190822220430.0
008 180221b2018 xxc|||p| p||| 00| 0 eng d
024 8 _ahttps://doi.org/10.5751/ES-09844-230114
040 _aMX-TxCIM
041 _aeng
100 1 _92418
_aAGGARWAL, P.K.
_gBISA Regional Program Leader
_8I1706967
245 1 4 _aThe climate-smart village approach :
_bframework of an integrative strategy for scaling up adaptation options in agriculture
_h[Electronic Resource]
260 _aCanada :
_bAcadia University,
_c2018.
500 _aPeer review
500 _aOpen Access
520 _aIncreasing weather risks threaten agricultural production systems and food security across the world. Maintaining agricultural growth while minimizing climate shocks is crucial to building a resilient food production system and meeting developmental goals in vulnerable countries. Experts have proposed several technological, institutional, and policy interventions to help farmers adapt to current and future weather variability and to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper presents the climate-smart village (CSV) approach as a means of performing agricultural research for development that robustly tests technological and institutional options for dealing with climatic variability and climate change in agriculture using participatory methods. It aims to scale up and scale out the appropriate options and draw out lessons for policy makers from local to global levels. The approach incorporates evaluation of climate-smart technologies, practices, services, and processes relevant to local climatic risk management and identifies opportunities for maximizing adaptation gains from synergies across different interventions and recognizing potential maladaptation and trade-offs. It ensures that these are aligned with local knowledge and link into development plans. This paper describes early results in Asia, Africa, and Latin America to illustrate different examples of the CSV approach in diverse agroecological settings. Results from initial studies indicate that the CSV approach has a high potential for scaling out promising climate-smart agricultural technologies, practices, and services. Climate analog studies indicate that the lessons learned at the CSV sites would be relevant to adaptation planning in a large part of global agricultural land even under scenarios of climate change. Key barriers and opportunities for further work are also discussed.
526 _aCCAFS
546 _aText in English
650 7 _92419
_aClimate-smart agriculture
_2AGROVOC
650 7 _91045
_aClimate change
_2AGROVOC
650 7 _96026
_aAdaptation
_2AGROVOC
650 7 _95030
_aResilience
_2AGROVOC
700 1 _92746
_aJarvis, A.
700 1 _93681
_aCampbell, B.M.
700 1 _93215
_aZougmore, R.
700 1 _91402
_aKhatri-Chhetri, A.
_8I1706974
_gBorlaug Institute of South Asia
700 1 _93217
_aVermeulen, S.
700 1 _93222
_aLoboguerrero-Rodriguez, A.M.
700 1 _96487
_aSebastian, L.
700 1 _96489
_aKinyangi, J.
700 1 _96251
_aBonilla-Findji, O.
700 1 _95389
_aRadeny, M.
700 1 _96490
_aRecha, J.
700 1 _93224
_aMartinez-Baron, D.
700 1 _96491
_aRamirez Villegas, J.
700 1 _93216
_aHuyer, S.
700 1 _92413
_aThornton, P.K.
700 1 _93656
_aWollenberg, E.
700 1 _96421
_aHansen, J.W.
700 1 _96493
_aAlvarez Toro, P.
700 1 _96494
_aAguilar Ariza, A.
700 1 _96495
_aArango Londoño, D.
700 1 _96497
_aPatiño Bravo, V.
700 1 _96498
_aRivera, O.
700 1 _96499
_aOuedraogo, M.
700 0 _96500
_aBui Tan Yen
773 0 _gv. 23, no. 1:14
_tEcology and Society
_x1708-3087
856 4 _yOpen Access through Dspace
_uhttps://hdl.handle.net/10883/19344
942 _2ddc
_cJA
_n0