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Simulating root development and soil resource acquisition in dynamic models of crop?weed competition

By: Berger, A.G.
Contributor(s): Riha, S.J [coaut.] | Timlin, D.|Ahuja, L.R | McDonald, A [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Advances in Agricultural Systems Modeling Transdicsciplinary Research, Synthesis, and Applications ; 4.Analytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Madison, WI (USA) American Society of Agronomy : 2013Description: p. 229-244.ISBN: 978-0891183389.Summary: Knowledge of root system configuration and soil resource acquisition is essential for understanding whole plant growth and for assessing and predicting the dynamics of interplant competition. Competition models developed to date address root growth and development in varied levels of complexity and detail. The experience gained with these models and 4 yr of field experiments highlights the importance of coupling aboveground and belowground plant growth by accounting for the carbohydrate cost of root system development and the scaling of root system size to aboveground plant size. Field experiments have demonstrated that this tight scaling is maintained across competitive environments and suggest small variation across tested weed species. Soil water extraction and plant growth data further suggest that root function cannot be separated from aboveground growth and competitive interactions, as the driving forces determining functioning of the root system are located in the aboveground parts of the plant and are subject to changes in the environment (i.e., light availability) imposed by competing plants. These concepts have been summarized in a spatially explicit, individual based model (COMPETE) assembled utilizing components of tested and validated mechanistic models (Maestra, PNM, LeachN and Gecros). COMPETE captures the major dynamics of the growth of a population of competing plants (i.e., formation of canopy hierarchies) and also simulates changes in plant transpiration as a function of plant size and competitive environment. Insights gained with models like COMPETE will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of root system functioning and improve its representation in simulation models.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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Knowledge of root system configuration and soil resource acquisition is essential for understanding whole plant growth and for assessing and predicting the dynamics of interplant competition. Competition models developed to date address root growth and development in varied levels of complexity and detail. The experience gained with these models and 4 yr of field experiments highlights the importance of coupling aboveground and belowground plant growth by accounting for the carbohydrate cost of root system development and the scaling of root system size to aboveground plant size. Field experiments have demonstrated that this tight scaling is maintained across competitive environments and suggest small variation across tested weed species. Soil water extraction and plant growth data further suggest that root function cannot be separated from aboveground growth and competitive interactions, as the driving forces determining functioning of the root system are located in the aboveground parts of the plant and are subject to changes in the environment (i.e., light availability) imposed by competing plants. These concepts have been summarized in a spatially explicit, individual based model (COMPETE) assembled utilizing components of tested and validated mechanistic models (Maestra, PNM, LeachN and Gecros). COMPETE captures the major dynamics of the growth of a population of competing plants (i.e., formation of canopy hierarchies) and also simulates changes in plant transpiration as a function of plant size and competitive environment. Insights gained with models like COMPETE will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of root system functioning and improve its representation in simulation models.

Conservation Agriculture Program

English

Lucia Segura

INT3034

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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