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The impact of high CO2 on plant abiotic stress tolerance

By: Lopes, M.S.
Contributor(s): Araus, J.L.|Slafer, G.A | Foyer, C.H [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CABI Climate Change ; 2.Analytics: Show analyticsPublisher: 2011Description: p. 85-104.ISBN: 978-1-84593-680-8.Summary: This chapter reviews the state-of-the-art and current concepts regarding plant responses to elevated CO2, particularly in terms of whole-plant morphology, molecular physiology and development. It is generally accepted that high temperatures have a severe negative effect on grain quality, and this will probably be exacerbated by elevated CO2 levels. The predicted increases in the temperature of the earth, together with the increased likelihood of heat stress, may serve to reverse the positive effects of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis and plant growth, particularly in C3 species. Plant breeding strategies must therefore incorporate marker-assisted selection with genes that confer improved thermo-tolerance in order to address the growing problem of heat stress and its likely negative impacts on food security and grain quality.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Reprint Reprint CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-6724 (Browse shelf) Available
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This chapter reviews the state-of-the-art and current concepts regarding plant responses to elevated CO2, particularly in terms of whole-plant morphology, molecular physiology and development. It is generally accepted that high temperatures have a severe negative effect on grain quality, and this will probably be exacerbated by elevated CO2 levels. The predicted increases in the temperature of the earth, together with the increased likelihood of heat stress, may serve to reverse the positive effects of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis and plant growth, particularly in C3 species. Plant breeding strategies must therefore incorporate marker-assisted selection with genes that confer improved thermo-tolerance in order to address the growing problem of heat stress and its likely negative impacts on food security and grain quality.

Global Wheat Program

English

Lucia Segura

INT2835

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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