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Some experiences with conservation agriculture in southern Africa

By: Wall, P.C.
Contributor(s): Humphreys, E|Bayot, R.S | Thierfelder, C [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Colombo (Sri Lanka) CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food : 2009Description: p. 25-36.Subject(s): basin planting | mulch | rainfed | Water use efficiency AGROVOC | Zero tillageOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff Summary: Conservation agriculture (CA) is a term used to describe agricultural systems that combine three basic principles: soil cover with crops and/or crop residues, minimal soil movement and crop rotation. One of the major benefits of CA is improved water use efficiency, whether this be from rainfall or irrigation, by increasing water infiltration rates and reducing evaporation. In rainfed systems the higher infiltration rates on CA fields generally result in less water run]off and less soil erosion. Data from trials in Zambia and Zimbabwe confirm the improved crop water balance under CA, although these do not always result in higher crop yields if moisture stress is not an important factor during the particular season. In on]farm trials in Zimbabwe, crop yields are generally increased by the CA practices and these increased yields represent greater rainfall use efficiency. CA practices have not been incorporated into trials managed under the Water and Food Challenge Programme PN1, but results from Mozambique do show positive effects of mulch (residue cover) on crop growth and yield.
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

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Conservation agriculture (CA) is a term used to describe agricultural systems that combine three basic principles: soil cover with crops and/or crop residues, minimal soil movement and crop rotation. One of the major benefits of CA is improved water use efficiency, whether this be from rainfall or irrigation, by increasing water infiltration rates and reducing evaporation. In rainfed systems the higher infiltration rates on CA fields generally result in less water run]off and less soil erosion. Data from trials in Zambia and Zimbabwe confirm the improved crop water balance under CA, although these do not always result in higher crop yields if moisture stress is not an important factor during the particular season. In on]farm trials in Zimbabwe, crop yields are generally increased by the CA practices and these increased yields represent greater rainfall use efficiency. CA practices have not been incorporated into trials managed under the Water and Food Challenge Programme PN1, but results from Mozambique do show positive effects of mulch (residue cover) on crop growth and yield.

Conservation Agriculture Program

English

Lucia Segura

INT2939

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