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Enhancing soil productivity for sustained food production for small-scale farmers in Malawi: a Sasakawa Global 2000 and agricultural extension partnership initiative

By: Valencia, J.A | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT) Kenya | 7. Proceedings of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Maize Conference Nairobi (Kenya) 5-11 Feb 2002.
Contributor(s): Friesen, D.K.|Palmer, A.F.E [eds.] | Nyirenda, N.E [coaut.] | Saka, A.R [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Nairobi (Kenya) KARI|CIMMYT : 2002Description: p. 343-349.ISBN: 970-648-120-6.Subject(s): Agricultural economics | Crop yield | Farmers | Fertilization | Food crops | Maize | Malawi | Seed production | CIMMYT | KARIDDC classification: 338.16 Summary: Maize is the main staple food crop for the majority of Malawians. It is grown on 1.3 million hectares of land with a national average yield of 1.38 tonnes per hectare resulting in an estimated national production of 1.8 million metric tonnes. This is not adequate to feed a population that is currently estimated at 10.5 million and growing at the rate of 3.1% per year . Declining soil fertility, poor agronomic practices and low adoption rates of the recommended technologies have been singled out as the main factors constraining maize production in Malawi, especially under smallholder farm conditions. To address these problems, the Malawi Government, in partnership with Sasakawa Global 2000, initiated an agricultural project aimed at transferring and disseminating the recommended agricultural technologies to smallholder farmers, which have hitherto not been adopted by them. Through this partnership, staff of the Department of Agricultural Extension Services and smallholder farmers, established maize demonstration plots in Blantyre, Machinga, Lilongwe, Salima and Mzuzu Agricultural Development Divisions. The major objective in these demonstrations is to train farmers and field assistants in the proper use of hybrid maize seed, optimum plant populations, timely application of fertilisers and good cultural practices so as to increase maize yields per unit area. The concept of conservation tillage was also introduced and demonstrated to smallholder farmers in the country. Round up, a post emergence herbicide, and Bullet, a residual herbicide, were used to control weeds in maize plots. Yields averaging more than 5 tonnes per hectare have been obtained from both the conventionally tilled plots and the no-till (conservation) demonstration plots. Farmers are very enthusiastic about the good performance of the technologies and are quickly adopting these. This fast adoption rate can mainly be attributed to higher maize yields in the improved technology plots compared with the farmers' own traditional plots, and the subsequent economic benefits. The training offered to both extension field staff and farmers has been instrumental in imparting knowledge and skills in the technology transfer and delivery system.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 338.16 FRI (Browse shelf) 1 Available 1N630188
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Maize is the main staple food crop for the majority of Malawians. It is grown on 1.3 million hectares of land with a national average yield of 1.38 tonnes per hectare resulting in an estimated national production of 1.8 million metric tonnes. This is not adequate to feed a population that is currently estimated at 10.5 million and growing at the rate of 3.1% per year . Declining soil fertility, poor agronomic practices and low adoption rates of the recommended technologies have been singled out as the main factors constraining maize production in Malawi, especially under smallholder farm conditions. To address these problems, the Malawi Government, in partnership with Sasakawa Global 2000, initiated an agricultural project aimed at transferring and disseminating the recommended agricultural technologies to smallholder farmers, which have hitherto not been adopted by them. Through this partnership, staff of the Department of Agricultural Extension Services and smallholder farmers, established maize demonstration plots in Blantyre, Machinga, Lilongwe, Salima and Mzuzu Agricultural Development Divisions. The major objective in these demonstrations is to train farmers and field assistants in the proper use of hybrid maize seed, optimum plant populations, timely application of fertilisers and good cultural practices so as to increase maize yields per unit area. The concept of conservation tillage was also introduced and demonstrated to smallholder farmers in the country. Round up, a post emergence herbicide, and Bullet, a residual herbicide, were used to control weeds in maize plots. Yields averaging more than 5 tonnes per hectare have been obtained from both the conventionally tilled plots and the no-till (conservation) demonstration plots. Farmers are very enthusiastic about the good performance of the technologies and are quickly adopting these. This fast adoption rate can mainly be attributed to higher maize yields in the improved technology plots compared with the farmers' own traditional plots, and the subsequent economic benefits. The training offered to both extension field staff and farmers has been instrumental in imparting knowledge and skills in the technology transfer and delivery system.

English

0410|AGRIS 0401|AL-Maize Program

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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