Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Impact of the adoption of modern varieties of rice on productivity gains and income distribution for the irrigated and the rain-fed ecosystem

By: Hossain, M | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico) | International Conference on Impacts of Agricultural Research and Development San José (Costa Rica) 4-7 Feb 2002.
Contributor(s): Agarwal, A.G [coaut.] | Bose, M.L [coaut.] | Marciano, E.B [coaut.] | Thakur, J [coaut.] | Ut, T.T [coaut.] | Watson, D.J [ed.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 2003Description: p. 80.ISBN: 970-648-104-4.Subject(s): Cost analysis | Ecosystems | Income distribution | Irrigation | Rainfed farming | Rice | Seed production | Systems analysis | Varieties | CIMMYT | IRRIDDC classification: 338.91 Summary: Modern varieties (MV) cover approximately 75% of Asian rice lands, with 55% of rice production occurring in irrigated ecosystems. However, a significant portion of MV rice is grown under rain-fed conditions with unfavorable growing environments. Good water control is considered a precondition for realizing the productivity and profitability potentials of modern rice varieties. This paper tests the hypothesis that the adoption of modern varieties under rain-fed conditions would not increase yields enough to compensate for additional input costs, and would only have a marginal impact on profitability gains and household income5 compared to substantial gains for the irrigated ecosystem. The data for this paper are drawn from household level sample surveys conducted by the Social Sciences Division of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in collaboration with national agricultural research system partners in Bangladesh, in the states of Bihar and Chhatisgarh in India, and in the Philippines and Vietnam during the late 1990s. The village were selected to represent different rice growing environments. All households in selected villages were covered by the survey except for Bangladesh and Vietnam, where a sample of the households was selected using stratified random sampling. The primary data are used to estimate unit costs, labor productivity, and household incomes, and the factor shares of land, labor, and capital in the production of modern varieties under irrigated and rain-fed conditions. A multivariate regression model of determinants of income is estimated to identify the effect of technology, factor endowments, and environmental factors on incomes from rice cultivation, as well as total household incomes. Two interaction terms of the coverage of modern varieties and irrigation are included in the model for rice incomes to measure the separate effects of the adoption of modern varieties in rain-fed and irrigated areas. The model is estimated for total household incomes to assess the net effect, as the adoption of modern varieties may lead to diversion of household resources from non-rice and non-farm economic activities to rice cultivation. A Gini Decomposition Analysis is conducted to assess the income distribution effect associated with the adoption of MV rice for the irrigated and the rain-fed ecosystems. Results are discussed in this paper.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 338.91 WAT (Browse shelf) 1 Available 1U632147
Total holds: 0

Modern varieties (MV) cover approximately 75% of Asian rice lands, with 55% of rice production occurring in irrigated ecosystems. However, a significant portion of MV rice is grown under rain-fed conditions with unfavorable growing environments. Good water control is considered a precondition for realizing the productivity and profitability potentials of modern rice varieties. This paper tests the hypothesis that the adoption of modern varieties under rain-fed conditions would not increase yields enough to compensate for additional input costs, and would only have a marginal impact on profitability gains and household income5 compared to substantial gains for the irrigated ecosystem. The data for this paper are drawn from household level sample surveys conducted by the Social Sciences Division of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in collaboration with national agricultural research system partners in Bangladesh, in the states of Bihar and Chhatisgarh in India, and in the Philippines and Vietnam during the late 1990s. The village were selected to represent different rice growing environments. All households in selected villages were covered by the survey except for Bangladesh and Vietnam, where a sample of the households was selected using stratified random sampling. The primary data are used to estimate unit costs, labor productivity, and household incomes, and the factor shares of land, labor, and capital in the production of modern varieties under irrigated and rain-fed conditions. A multivariate regression model of determinants of income is estimated to identify the effect of technology, factor endowments, and environmental factors on incomes from rice cultivation, as well as total household incomes. Two interaction terms of the coverage of modern varieties and irrigation are included in the model for rice incomes to measure the separate effects of the adoption of modern varieties in rain-fed and irrigated areas. The model is estimated for total household incomes to assess the net effect, as the adoption of modern varieties may lead to diversion of household resources from non-rice and non-farm economic activities to rice cultivation. A Gini Decomposition Analysis is conducted to assess the income distribution effect associated with the adoption of MV rice for the irrigated and the rain-fed ecosystems. Results are discussed in this paper.

English

0310|AGRIS 0301|AL-Economics Program|R01PROCE

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org