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Evaluation, distribution and utilization of CIMMYT maize germplasm in Asia

By: Srinivasan, G | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico, DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Vasal, S.K [coaut.] | Vasal, S.K.|Gonzalez Ceniceros, F.|XiongMing, F [eds.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Los Baños, Laguna (Philippines) PCARRD : 2000Description: 10 pages.Subject(s): Developing Countries | Germplasm | Inbred lines | Maize | Testing | Variety trials | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOC | Agricultural research AGROVOCSummary: In 1973, CIMMYT started testing maize germplasm developed at its headquarters in Mexico through a systematic network of international trials. In the last 25 years of international testing, more than 20,000 trials have been distributed and tested in more than 80 countries involving over 1,000 collaborators. This network of trials provided valuable information which were used in the germplasm improvement efforts of scientists at CIMMYT as well as in the National Agricultural Research Systems (NARs). The performance information from these varietal trials was used by the NARs in identifying useful germplasm for their needs and further improving and releasing them as improved cultivars. A recent study conducted by CIMMYT in 1990 estimated that because of this extensive testing, and distribution of maize germplasm, the NARs in the developing world have released more than 500 improved maize cultivars containing CIMMYT derived germplasm and these are grown in approximately 14 million hectares. Over the years, the maize growing countries in the Asian region have actively participated in CIMMYT's international maize testing efforts. The number of trials received from Mexico and evaluated in the region and the return of trial results are proof of this excellent collaborative efforts between CIMMYT and NARs. The quality of the data collected and the enormous information derived from these trials are extremely useful to CIMMYT and NARs. Traditionally, CIMMYT had distributed International Progeny Testing trials (IPTTs) and Experimental Variety Trials (EVTs) for well over 20 years. In 1994, CIMMYT introduced a new set of trials to test hybrids under the name of CIMMYT Hybrid Trials (CHTs). This was a concerted decision by CIMMYT in response to the increasing demand for hybrid oriented germplasm by the national programs. These CHTs are entering their fifth year of distribution in 1998 and are still in great demand. Due to demand for elite inbred lines from both public and private sector NARs in the developing countries, CIMMYT started releasing elite inbred lines in 1991 including a new set of inbred lines that are to be released soon. CIMMYT has so far made available over 400 CIMMYT Maize Lines (CMLs). These lines are of tropical, subtropical, mid-altitude and highland adaptation and possess tolerance to important biotic and abiotic stresses. Lines with normal and QPM grain type were also released. These inbred lines are already in the hands of several of our NARs partners and are being extensively used in their breeding efforts. Several of these lines have made it into hybrid combinations that are being released. In this presentation, results from hybrid trials (CHTs) and experimental varietal trials (EVTs) that were conducted in the Asian region during the last four years will be discussed. These trials have helped CIMMYT and NARs to identify elite hybrids that are not only high yielding, but also having resistance to specific biotic and abiotic stresses. This information, we hope will be useful for the breeders to make decisions on CIMMYT germplasm to use in their breeding programs. Genotype x environment interactions using AMMI will be presented and discussed in these materials.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-3380 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 631347
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In 1973, CIMMYT started testing maize germplasm developed at its headquarters in Mexico through a systematic network of international trials. In the last 25 years of international testing, more than 20,000 trials have been distributed and tested in more than 80 countries involving over 1,000 collaborators. This network of trials provided valuable information which were used in the germplasm improvement efforts of scientists at CIMMYT as well as in the National Agricultural Research Systems (NARs). The performance information from these varietal trials was used by the NARs in identifying useful germplasm for their needs and further improving and releasing them as improved cultivars. A recent study conducted by CIMMYT in 1990 estimated that because of this extensive testing, and distribution of maize germplasm, the NARs in the developing world have released more than 500 improved maize cultivars containing CIMMYT derived germplasm and these are grown in approximately 14 million hectares. Over the years, the maize growing countries in the Asian region have actively participated in CIMMYT's international maize testing efforts. The number of trials received from Mexico and evaluated in the region and the return of trial results are proof of this excellent collaborative efforts between CIMMYT and NARs. The quality of the data collected and the enormous information derived from these trials are extremely useful to CIMMYT and NARs. Traditionally, CIMMYT had distributed International Progeny Testing trials (IPTTs) and Experimental Variety Trials (EVTs) for well over 20 years. In 1994, CIMMYT introduced a new set of trials to test hybrids under the name of CIMMYT Hybrid Trials (CHTs). This was a concerted decision by CIMMYT in response to the increasing demand for hybrid oriented germplasm by the national programs. These CHTs are entering their fifth year of distribution in 1998 and are still in great demand. Due to demand for elite inbred lines from both public and private sector NARs in the developing countries, CIMMYT started releasing elite inbred lines in 1991 including a new set of inbred lines that are to be released soon. CIMMYT has so far made available over 400 CIMMYT Maize Lines (CMLs). These lines are of tropical, subtropical, mid-altitude and highland adaptation and possess tolerance to important biotic and abiotic stresses. Lines with normal and QPM grain type were also released. These inbred lines are already in the hands of several of our NARs partners and are being extensively used in their breeding efforts. Several of these lines have made it into hybrid combinations that are being released. In this presentation, results from hybrid trials (CHTs) and experimental varietal trials (EVTs) that were conducted in the Asian region during the last four years will be discussed. These trials have helped CIMMYT and NARs to identify elite hybrids that are not only high yielding, but also having resistance to specific biotic and abiotic stresses. This information, we hope will be useful for the breeders to make decisions on CIMMYT germplasm to use in their breeding programs. Genotype x environment interactions using AMMI will be presented and discussed in these materials.

English

0208|AGRIS 0201|AL-Maize Program|R01PROCE

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org