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CIMMYT and its partners: Developing sustainable maize systems for the poor

By: Pandey, S | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico, DF (Mexico) | 7, Proceedings of the Asian Regional Maize Workshop Los Baños (Philippines) 23-27 Feb 1998.
Contributor(s): Vasal, S.K.|Gonzalez Ceniceros, F.|XiongMing, F.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Los Baños, Laguna (Philippines) PCARRD : 2000Description: 7 pages.Subject(s): China | Feed cereals | Inbred lines | Maize | Productivity | Seed production | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOC | Plant breeding AGROVOCSummary: With 5.5% annual growth in income and 1.7% annual growth in already large population base, it is Asia where major inter-plays between demand and supply for maize will occur. Area and yield of maize will increase in most countries and regions of Asia. Demand per capita for maize for food will also rise in all countries except China and demand for maize as feed will rise more dramatically in this region than anywhere else in the world, specially in China and South East Asia. The increase in demand for maize will not be met by the regional production and Asia will import approximately 44 million Mt of this cereal. Major constraints affecting maize production today in Asia that are likely to continue into tomorrow are declining investment in agricultural research in most, if not all, countries; lack of OPVs and hybrids with high yield and stable performance, particularly of the early maturity type; low soil fertility, drought, water logging, and soil acidity; downy mildews, stalk rots, borers such as Chilo partellus and Sesamia calamistis, weeds; lack of adequate seed of high quality due to policies that do not foster full participation of the private sector; and the current economic uncertainty in some countries of South East Asia. A large array of improved germplasm, developed and improved through the traditional methodologies for maize growing environments in Asia exists. Innovative intercropping-, crop rotation-, organic manure-, and inorganic manure-based maize systems for soils with low fertility; reduced tillage-, mulching-, and green manuring-based maize systems for hill sides; and pasture- and rice-based systems for acidic soils have also been developed. Significant efforts have been devoted to enhance the scientific capabilities of NARs scientists. But with the growing population and income, today Asia needs more maize than ever. More maize must be produced in poorer lands than in the previous decades. So, the challenge is to not only produce more maize but do it on poorer soils, and do it in a sustainable way. This can only be achieved if we work together, harder, and smarter, utilizing the optimum combination of traditional and modem research tools. Germplasm conservation, development and enhancement, development of high-yielding and stress-tolerant OPVs and hybrids, and development of crop management systems that enhance productivity and sustainability need to receive continued priority. Integration of different disciplines pursuing maize research and development, collaboration among partners (public NARs, private sector, and NGOS) involved in the promotion of maize production within a country and among countries is vital to meeting the growing demand of maize in Asia.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-3377 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 631344
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With 5.5% annual growth in income and 1.7% annual growth in already large population base, it is Asia where major inter-plays between demand and supply for maize will occur. Area and yield of maize will increase in most countries and regions of Asia. Demand per capita for maize for food will also rise in all countries except China and demand for maize as feed will rise more dramatically in this region than anywhere else in the world, specially in China and South East Asia. The increase in demand for maize will not be met by the regional production and Asia will import approximately 44 million Mt of this cereal. Major constraints affecting maize production today in Asia that are likely to continue into tomorrow are declining investment in agricultural research in most, if not all, countries; lack of OPVs and hybrids with high yield and stable performance, particularly of the early maturity type; low soil fertility, drought, water logging, and soil acidity; downy mildews, stalk rots, borers such as Chilo partellus and Sesamia calamistis, weeds; lack of adequate seed of high quality due to policies that do not foster full participation of the private sector; and the current economic uncertainty in some countries of South East Asia. A large array of improved germplasm, developed and improved through the traditional methodologies for maize growing environments in Asia exists. Innovative intercropping-, crop rotation-, organic manure-, and inorganic manure-based maize systems for soils with low fertility; reduced tillage-, mulching-, and green manuring-based maize systems for hill sides; and pasture- and rice-based systems for acidic soils have also been developed. Significant efforts have been devoted to enhance the scientific capabilities of NARs scientists. But with the growing population and income, today Asia needs more maize than ever. More maize must be produced in poorer lands than in the previous decades. So, the challenge is to not only produce more maize but do it on poorer soils, and do it in a sustainable way. This can only be achieved if we work together, harder, and smarter, utilizing the optimum combination of traditional and modem research tools. Germplasm conservation, development and enhancement, development of high-yielding and stress-tolerant OPVs and hybrids, and development of crop management systems that enhance productivity and sustainability need to receive continued priority. Integration of different disciplines pursuing maize research and development, collaboration among partners (public NARs, private sector, and NGOS) involved in the promotion of maize production within a country and among countries is vital to meeting the growing demand of maize in Asia.

English

0208|AGRIS 0201|AL-Maize Program|R01PROCE

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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