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Advances in asian corn borer IPM research: The experience in China

By: Darong, Z | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico, DF (Mexico) | 7, Proceedings of the Asian Regional Maize Workshop Los Baños (Philippines) 23-27 Feb 1998.
Contributor(s): Kanglai, H [coaut.] | Vasal, S.K.|Gonzalez Ceniceros, F.|XiongMing, F | Yanying, S [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Los Baños, Laguna (Philippines) PCARRD : 2000Description: p. 47-57.Subject(s): Asia | Biological control | Infestation | Maize | Pest insects | Yield factors | Zea mays AGROVOC | Agricultural research AGROVOCSummary: In China, the Asian corn borer (ACE), Ostrinia furnacalis (Gueene), is the most destructive insect pest of maize, Zea mays. In an ordinary year, the average annual loss caused by the ACE was estimated at 7 to 10 and 20 to 30% for spring maize and summer maize, respectively. If an outbreak occurred, the loss would be much higher. In this paper, over 30 years of research in ACE IPM are briefly summarized, mainly including identification and distribution of dominant species, mass rearing, behavior of adults, yield reduction and economic threshold, outbreak prediction and forecasting, cultural control, host plant resistance, mechanical control, biological control, and chemical control. In addition, the guidelines for selection of possible IPM components were discussed. In China, the Asian corn borer (ACE), Ostrinia furnacalis (Gueene), is the most destructive insect pest of maize, Zea mays, and it frequently reaches high level infestation on other crops such as millet, and especially cotton in recent years in the South (Zhou and He 1995). Therefore, it is considered of tremendous economic importance to mankind. The range of adaptation expands from the coldest Heilongjiang Province of above 40° latitude north to the subtropical and even tropical areas. Throughout the vast territory of the country, it produces from one to seven generation(s) a year (He et ai. 1997). As for a general pattern of infestation on maize itself, only one or two generation(s) occur. One attacks the whorl stage of maize development and the other the pollen-shedding stage. In the former, it begins with an early instar larvae feeding upon whorl tissue and ears, with the later instar larvae, especially the early 5d1 instar, boring into the stems near the young ear to inhibit ear development. The damage is caused by larvae boring directly into the ears, attacking the young kernels and also inducing ear rot diseases. This species is estimated to cause millions of US dollars loss of crops all over the country. Owing to its economic importance, researchers in China have paid much attention to ACE control since 1949.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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In China, the Asian corn borer (ACE), Ostrinia furnacalis (Gueene), is the most destructive insect pest of maize, Zea mays. In an ordinary year, the average annual loss caused by the ACE was estimated at 7 to 10 and 20 to 30% for spring maize and summer maize, respectively. If an outbreak occurred, the loss would be much higher. In this paper, over 30 years of research in ACE IPM are briefly summarized, mainly including identification and distribution of dominant species, mass rearing, behavior of adults, yield reduction and economic threshold, outbreak prediction and forecasting, cultural control, host plant resistance, mechanical control, biological control, and chemical control. In addition, the guidelines for selection of possible IPM components were discussed. In China, the Asian corn borer (ACE), Ostrinia furnacalis (Gueene), is the most destructive insect pest of maize, Zea mays, and it frequently reaches high level infestation on other crops such as millet, and especially cotton in recent years in the South (Zhou and He 1995). Therefore, it is considered of tremendous economic importance to mankind. The range of adaptation expands from the coldest Heilongjiang Province of above 40° latitude north to the subtropical and even tropical areas. Throughout the vast territory of the country, it produces from one to seven generation(s) a year (He et ai. 1997). As for a general pattern of infestation on maize itself, only one or two generation(s) occur. One attacks the whorl stage of maize development and the other the pollen-shedding stage. In the former, it begins with an early instar larvae feeding upon whorl tissue and ears, with the later instar larvae, especially the early 5d1 instar, boring into the stems near the young ear to inhibit ear development. The damage is caused by larvae boring directly into the ears, attacking the young kernels and also inducing ear rot diseases. This species is estimated to cause millions of US dollars loss of crops all over the country. Owing to its economic importance, researchers in China have paid much attention to ACE control since 1949.

English

0208|AGRIS 0201|AL-Maize Program|R01PROCE

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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