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Issues of intellectual property rights and biosafety in Asia

By: Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico, DF (Mexico) | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico) | 7, Proceedings of the Asian Regional Maize Workshop Los Baños (Philippines) 23-27 Feb 1998.
Contributor(s): Sriwatanapongse, S [ed.] | Vasal, S.K.|Gonzalez Ceniceros, F.|XiongMing, F.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Los Baños, Laguna (Philippines) : PCARRD, 2000Description: p. 30-37.Subject(s): Biotechnology | Developing Countries | Economic growth | Legal rights | Property transfers | Right of access | Technology | Hybrids AGROVOC | Plant breeding AGROVOCSummary: Intellectual property rights (IPRs) as legal instruments are increasingly important in encouraging industrial development and economic growth. The conclusion of the new General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1994 has obliged member states to stop unauthorized diffusion of innovations in a wide range of technological sectors including those of biotechnology. There has been efforts in the movement toward a unified, global intellectual property rights among developed countries. At the same time developing countries are resisting, both formally in international fora and informally through less-than-aggressive administration of their own intellectual property right (IPR) legislation. As a result, considerable international tension and animosity exist between most developing countries and many developed countries. Recent multilateral and bilateral negotiations and agreements have brought to the forefront several issues related to intellectual property protection in agriculture. Member countries of the World Trade Organization (WTO) are obliged to establish a legal system that effectively protects intellectual property in plant breeding, for an example. The plant variety protection (PVP) system has been proposed as an option. The system, however, has basically been developed in industrialized countries and few questions still remain to be answered. Will such a system also be useful in less developed countries? What is needed to establish such a system, how will it affect the agricultural sector, and how will it affect the conservation of plant genetic resources? The system seems to give protection only to the new varieties. How about the old, traditional varieties? Few countries in Asia, Thailand included, have tried to develop their PVP system with the above questions in mind. The main principle is to have the protection of new varieties similar to the UPOV system. The old, traditional varieties and the wild plant species should be protected under other systems such as the sui generis system. At present, biotechnology has been rapidly developed with potential use in improving productivity in agriculture as well as in other industrial sectors. The improvement of plant varieties using DNA technology -genetic engineering could lead to the development of new plants with novel genes that could not be accomplished through traditional breeding. However, the transgenic plants may pose possible adverse effects on human health and environment and biosafety has been an important issue in the Convention on Biological Diversity .Thailand has joined other countries in the region developing its own biosafety guidelines. It is quite crucial that an intellectual property system be established in order to stimulate more research and development. At the same time the biosafety issues should be taken into consideration in its development.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

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Intellectual property rights (IPRs) as legal instruments are increasingly important in encouraging industrial development and economic growth. The conclusion of the new General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1994 has obliged member states to stop unauthorized diffusion of innovations in a wide range of technological sectors including those of biotechnology. There has been efforts in the movement toward a unified, global intellectual property rights among developed countries. At the same time developing countries are resisting, both formally in international fora and informally through less-than-aggressive administration of their own intellectual property right (IPR) legislation. As a result, considerable international tension and animosity exist between most developing countries and many developed countries. Recent multilateral and bilateral negotiations and agreements have brought to the forefront several issues related to intellectual property protection in agriculture. Member countries of the World Trade Organization (WTO) are obliged to establish a legal system that effectively protects intellectual property in plant breeding, for an example. The plant variety protection (PVP) system has been proposed as an option. The system, however, has basically been developed in industrialized countries and few questions still remain to be answered. Will such a system also be useful in less developed countries? What is needed to establish such a system, how will it affect the agricultural sector, and how will it affect the conservation of plant genetic resources? The system seems to give protection only to the new varieties. How about the old, traditional varieties? Few countries in Asia, Thailand included, have tried to develop their PVP system with the above questions in mind. The main principle is to have the protection of new varieties similar to the UPOV system. The old, traditional varieties and the wild plant species should be protected under other systems such as the sui generis system. At present, biotechnology has been rapidly developed with potential use in improving productivity in agriculture as well as in other industrial sectors. The improvement of plant varieties using DNA technology -genetic engineering could lead to the development of new plants with novel genes that could not be accomplished through traditional breeding. However, the transgenic plants may pose possible adverse effects on human health and environment and biosafety has been an important issue in the Convention on Biological Diversity .Thailand has joined other countries in the region developing its own biosafety guidelines. It is quite crucial that an intellectual property system be established in order to stimulate more research and development. At the same time the biosafety issues should be taken into consideration in its development.

English

0208|AGRIS 0201|AL-Maize Program|R01PROCE

Juan Carlos Mendieta

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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