Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The importance of crop residue management in maintaning soil quality in zero tillage systems; a comparison between long-term trials in rainfed and irrigated wheat systems

By: Verhulst, N.
Contributor(s): Deckeres, J [coaut.] | Kienle, F [coaut.] | Limon Ortega, A [coaut.] | Raes, D [coaut.] | Sayre, K.D [coaut.] | Verachtert, E [coaut.] | Govaerts, B.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: 2009Description: p. 71-79.Subject(s): permanent raised bed planting | Residue management | Soil quality | Zero tillage | CIMMYTOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff Summary: CIMMYT is committed to improving livelihoods in developing countries by improving the productivity and profitability of farming systems while sustaining natural resources. This paper focuses on the influence of crop residue management on soil quality in zero till systems and includes results from two long-term trials established in the early 1990?s in different agro-ecological systems in Mexico: (1) a low-input, semi-arid, rainfed system in the rainfed central highlands (2240 masl) with zero tillage on the flat and (2) a high-input, arid, irrigated system in the northwestern part of the country with zero tilled permanent raised beds. In both zero till systems, the (partial) retention of the crop residues was necessary to maintain soil quality. In the rainfed semi-arid zero tillage system, mean weight diameter obtained by dry sieving, aggregate stability, infiltration, soil moisture content, soil microbial biomass and nutrient status were lower with residue removal than with residue retention. In the irrigated permanent raised bed system, burning of all crop residues resulted in a degradation of soil structure, lower direct infiltration, irrigation efficiency, soil moisture content, soil microbial biomass, lower total N and greater soil sodicity as compared to retaining crop residue at the surface. Practices with partial retention of crop residue showed soil quality similar to practices with retention of all residues. The retention of at least part of the crop residue is essential for the sustainability of zero till systems, although it may be possible to remove part of the residue for other uses, especially in irrigated conditions where biomass production is high.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-5477 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 637880
Total holds: 0

CIMMYT is committed to improving livelihoods in developing countries by improving the productivity and profitability of farming systems while sustaining natural resources. This paper focuses on the influence of crop residue management on soil quality in zero till systems and includes results from two long-term trials established in the early 1990?s in different agro-ecological systems in Mexico: (1) a low-input, semi-arid, rainfed system in the rainfed central highlands (2240 masl) with zero tillage on the flat and (2) a high-input, arid, irrigated system in the northwestern part of the country with zero tilled permanent raised beds. In both zero till systems, the (partial) retention of the crop residues was necessary to maintain soil quality. In the rainfed semi-arid zero tillage system, mean weight diameter obtained by dry sieving, aggregate stability, infiltration, soil moisture content, soil microbial biomass and nutrient status were lower with residue removal than with residue retention. In the irrigated permanent raised bed system, burning of all crop residues resulted in a degradation of soil structure, lower direct infiltration, irrigation efficiency, soil moisture content, soil microbial biomass, lower total N and greater soil sodicity as compared to retaining crop residue at the surface. Practices with partial retention of crop residue showed soil quality similar to practices with retention of all residues. The retention of at least part of the crop residue is essential for the sustainability of zero till systems, although it may be possible to remove part of the residue for other uses, especially in irrigated conditions where biomass production is high.

Conservation Agriculture Program

English

0903|Berta

Jose Juan Caballero

INT2813|INT3307|CSAY01

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer

baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org