Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Spike photosynthesis measured at high throughput indicates genetic variation independent of flag leaf photosynthesis

By: Molero, G.
Contributor(s): Reynolds, M.P.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: Amsterdam (Netherlands) : Elsevier, 2020ISSN: 0378-4290.Subject(s): Genetic variation | Heat | Phenotypes | Spikes | Photosynthesis | Wheat | Plant breeding In: Field Crops Research v. 255, art. 107866Summary: Future increases in yield potential will rely largely on improved photosynthesis. Whereas emphasis has traditionally been given to measuring leaf photosynthesis, wheat spikes have an important role in filling grains since they can intercept up to a third of incident light. In the present study, 196 genetically diverse spring wheat lines were evaluated for spike photosynthesis (SP) under temperate (yield potential) and heat stressed, irrigated conditions. Two different methods to estimate SP were used: (i) gas exchange measurements of SP rate and (ii) integrative measurements using a SP inhibition treatment (consisting of a permeable textile covering the spikes). Rate of SP was measured directly in 45 selected genotypes under yield potential conditions using a custom-made illuminating chamber. In these lines, a variation of 2.8-fold for spike photosynthetic rate is reported for the first time with good heritability estimates. Correlations between SP rate and yield, thousand grain weight, number of grains per spike and radiation use efficiency are reported across different panels. Genotypic variation in SP was independent from flag leaf photosynthesis suggesting that any strategy aiming to increase canopy photosynthesis should also consider SP. The SP inhibition treatments were applied on the 196 lines in both environments to estimate SP contribution to grain weight per spike, which was 30?40 % under both heat stressed and yield potential conditions averaged across lines. Positive correlations with grain yield were observed for spike photosynthesis contribution across all of the panels under heat stress and when combining heat and yield potential environments (P < 0.001, r = 0.401). These results indicate a highly significant genotypic variation of spike photosynthetic rate and spike photosynthesis contribution to grain yield among wheat lines and highlight its importance under irrigated and heat stressed conditions.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection Available
Total holds: 0

Peer review

Future increases in yield potential will rely largely on improved photosynthesis. Whereas emphasis has traditionally been given to measuring leaf photosynthesis, wheat spikes have an important role in filling grains since they can intercept up to a third of incident light. In the present study, 196 genetically diverse spring wheat lines were evaluated for spike photosynthesis (SP) under temperate (yield potential) and heat stressed, irrigated conditions. Two different methods to estimate SP were used: (i) gas exchange measurements of SP rate and (ii) integrative measurements using a SP inhibition treatment (consisting of a permeable textile covering the spikes). Rate of SP was measured directly in 45 selected genotypes under yield potential conditions using a custom-made illuminating chamber. In these lines, a variation of 2.8-fold for spike photosynthetic rate is reported for the first time with good heritability estimates. Correlations between SP rate and yield, thousand grain weight, number of grains per spike and radiation use efficiency are reported across different panels. Genotypic variation in SP was independent from flag leaf photosynthesis suggesting that any strategy aiming to increase canopy photosynthesis should also consider SP. The SP inhibition treatments were applied on the 196 lines in both environments to estimate SP contribution to grain weight per spike, which was 30?40 % under both heat stressed and yield potential conditions averaged across lines. Positive correlations with grain yield were observed for spike photosynthesis contribution across all of the panels under heat stress and when combining heat and yield potential environments (P < 0.001, r = 0.401). These results indicate a highly significant genotypic variation of spike photosynthetic rate and spike photosynthesis contribution to grain yield among wheat lines and highlight its importance under irrigated and heat stressed conditions.

Text in English

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer

baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org