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Institutional change, climate risk, and rural vulnerability : cases from central Mexico

By: Eakin, H.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: Oxford (United Kingdom) : Elsevier, 2005ISSN: 0305-750X.Subject(s): Adaptation | Globalization | Trade Liberalization | Livelihoods | MexicoOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT staff In: World Development v. 33, n. 11, p. 1923-1938Summary: A multiscalar, multistressor assessment of rural vulnerability is presented, illustrating how globalization, market liberalization, and climatic risk simultaneously structure the livelihood strategies of Mexican smallholders. Ethnographic data collected in three communities are used to argue that farmers’ capacities to manage climatic risk are circumscribed by the ways in which they are able to negotiate changes in agricultural policy. Four livelihood strategies are explored in detail to show that market integration does not necessarily improve risk management capacity, and that subsistence maize production—while highly sensitive to hazards—may actually serve to enhance livelihood stability. The dominance of economic uncertainty over environmental risk in households’ decision making implies a continued role for government intervention to help households adapt to climatic stress.
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Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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A multiscalar, multistressor assessment of rural vulnerability is presented, illustrating how globalization, market liberalization, and climatic risk simultaneously structure the livelihood strategies of Mexican smallholders. Ethnographic data collected in three communities are used to argue that farmers’ capacities to manage climatic risk are circumscribed by the ways in which they are able to negotiate changes in agricultural policy. Four livelihood strategies are explored in detail to show that market integration does not necessarily improve risk management capacity, and that subsistence maize production—while highly sensitive to hazards—may actually serve to enhance livelihood stability. The dominance of economic uncertainty over environmental risk in households’ decision making implies a continued role for government intervention to help households adapt to climatic stress.

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Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org