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Participatory and institutional approaches to agricultural climate services : A south and southeast asia regional technical and learning exchange

By: Krupnik, T.J.
Contributor(s): Alam, A | Zebiak, S.E | Khanam, F | Hossain, M.K | Kamal, M | Miah, A.A | Shahriar, S. M | Khan, M. S. H | Hussain, S.G.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Dhaka, Bangladesh : CIMMYT, 2017Description: 212 pages.Subject(s): Climate | Weather data | CropsOnline resources: Access through Dspace Summary: The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Global framework for Climate Services (GFCS) define climate services as providing "... climate infarmolion in a way that assists decision making by individuals and organizations. Such services require appropriate engagement along with an effective access mechanism end must respond to user needs. Such services involve high-quality data from national and international dataixises on temperature, rainfall, wind, roil moisture and ocean concEtions, as well as mops, risk and vulnerability analyses, assessments, and long-term projections and scenarios. Depending on the user's needs, these data and information products may be combined with non-meteorological data, suds as agricultural production, health trends, population distributions in high-risk areas, road and infrastructure mops for the delivery of goods, and other soda-economic variables." Agricultural climate services collect, analyze and shore climate Information to ensure that farmers and other stakeholders have access to relevant information to make better-informed decisions. Some of these decisions might include how to manage livestock, and when and where ro sow particular crops or varieties, os well os how to manage these crops (both In the field and after post-harvest) so that climate risks are mitigated. Weather-based crop keurance programs, and pest and disease early warning systems, in addition to seasonal yield predictions, are among the fastest growing agricultural cimate services sectors. What, however is most Important, k that climate information must be conveyed in ways that are decision-relevant. This requires a radical re-thinking of how many agricultural extension and log-meteorological bulletins and advisories are produced and conveyed, with emphasis on involving farmers themselves in the development of appropriate cimate information and participatory extension messaging. The ultimate goal is to empower farmers, extension agents, agricultural development organizations, and policy makers with knowledge and new insights. This wit give them the capability to innovate and make informed dedsions, so they are better equipped to respond to climatic variability to overcome climate-related production and livelihood risks. Achieving this aim requires an ability to communkate across scientific disciplines, to establish the institutional arrangements to facilitate the exchange of cimate information to and from farming communities. In order to share experience and boost capacity in agricultural climate services, a three-day workshop titled 'Participatory and Institutional Approaches to Agricultural Climate Services Development A South and South East Asia Regional Technical and Learning exchange' was held between September 17-19, 2917, In Dhaka, Bangladesh, with more than 50 leaders in agricultural climate services from 11 countries altencIng. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S Agency for International Development IUSAUD) behalf of the Climate Services for Resilient Development (CSRD).
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Report CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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Open Access

Present at Climate Services for Resilient Development, September 17-19, 2017 Dhaka, Bangladesh.

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Global framework for Climate Services (GFCS) define climate services as providing "... climate infarmolion in a way that assists decision making by individuals and organizations. Such services require appropriate engagement along with an effective access mechanism end must respond to user needs. Such services involve high-quality data from national and international dataixises on temperature, rainfall, wind, roil moisture and ocean concEtions, as well as mops, risk and vulnerability analyses, assessments, and long-term projections and scenarios. Depending on the user's needs, these data and information products may be combined with non-meteorological data, suds as agricultural production, health trends, population distributions in high-risk areas, road and infrastructure mops for the delivery of goods, and other soda-economic variables." Agricultural climate services collect, analyze and shore climate Information to ensure that farmers and other stakeholders have access to relevant information to make better-informed decisions. Some of these decisions might include how to manage livestock, and when and where ro sow particular crops or varieties, os well os how to manage these crops (both In the field and after post-harvest) so that climate risks are mitigated. Weather-based crop keurance programs, and pest and disease early warning systems, in addition to seasonal yield predictions, are among the fastest growing agricultural cimate services sectors. What, however is most Important, k that climate information must be conveyed in ways that are decision-relevant. This requires a radical re-thinking of how many agricultural extension and log-meteorological bulletins and advisories are produced and conveyed, with emphasis on involving farmers themselves in the development of appropriate cimate information and participatory extension messaging. The ultimate goal is to empower farmers, extension agents, agricultural development organizations, and policy makers with knowledge and new insights. This wit give them the capability to innovate and make informed dedsions, so they are better equipped to respond to climatic variability to overcome climate-related production and livelihood risks. Achieving this aim requires an ability to communkate across scientific disciplines, to establish the institutional arrangements to facilitate the exchange of cimate information to and from farming communities. In order to share experience and boost capacity in agricultural climate services, a three-day workshop titled 'Participatory and Institutional Approaches to Agricultural Climate Services Development A South and South East Asia Regional Technical and Learning exchange' was held between September 17-19, 2917, In Dhaka, Bangladesh, with more than 50 leaders in agricultural climate services from 11 countries altencIng. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S Agency for International Development IUSAUD) behalf of the Climate Services for Resilient Development (CSRD).

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