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Energy consumption transition through the use of electricity for lighting and cooking : evidence from Bhutan

By: Rahut, D.B.
Contributor(s): Mottaleb, K.A | Ali, A | Aryal, J.P.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: Amsterdam, Netherlands : Elsevier, 2017Subject(s): Energy consumption | Electricity suppliesOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff In: Renewable Energy Focus v. 18, p. 11-21Summary: Energy ladder hypothesis states that with an increase in income and awareness households gradually switch from biomass to kerosene and finally to ultra-clean, renewable, green energy sources such as electricity. Electricity lies at the top of the energy ladder hypothesis for household energy use. Empirical results support the fact that income, wealth, gender and the educational status of households often influence the switch from dirty to clean energy; however, in some cases, households even with higher incomes, wealth, and education levels use electricity only for lighting but not for both lighting and cooking. This creates a ladder within the energy ladder. Using a nationally representative dataset collected by the government for the Bhutan Living Standard Measurement Study (2003, 2007 and 2012), covering more than 22,000 households, this study examines the factors influencing the use of electricity for lighting, and lighting and cooking by Bhutanese households. The results of multinomial logit model estimation demonstrate that demographic features, wealth and the education levels of households, in addition to access to infrastructure significantly influence a household's use of electricity for lighting and cooking, which supports a ladder within the energy ladder hypothesis.
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Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection Available
Total holds: 0

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Energy ladder hypothesis states that with an increase in income and awareness households gradually switch from biomass to kerosene and finally to ultra-clean, renewable, green energy sources such as electricity. Electricity lies at the top of the energy ladder hypothesis for household energy use. Empirical results support the fact that income, wealth, gender and the educational status of households often influence the switch from dirty to clean energy; however, in some cases, households even with higher incomes, wealth, and education levels use electricity only for lighting but not for both lighting and cooking. This creates a ladder within the energy ladder. Using a nationally representative dataset collected by the government for the Bhutan Living Standard Measurement Study (2003, 2007 and 2012), covering more than 22,000 households, this study examines the factors influencing the use of electricity for lighting, and lighting and cooking by Bhutanese households. The results of multinomial logit model estimation demonstrate that demographic features, wealth and the education levels of households, in addition to access to infrastructure significantly influence a household's use of electricity for lighting and cooking, which supports a ladder within the energy ladder hypothesis.

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