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Chapter CS4. Building agricultural resilience in Nigeria through index insurance and scaling out of climate smart agriculture

By: Hansen, J.
Contributor(s): Araba, D | Hellin, J. J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelChapterSeries: Working Paper ; No. 135.Publisher: Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), 2015Subject(s): Climate-smart agricultureOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff In: Westermann, O. Reaching more farmers Innovative approaches to scaling up climate-smart agriculture p. 50-55Summary: Well-designed and agricultural insurance can contribute directly to climate resilience. It can also mitigate risk that often acts as a barrier to farmer adoption of climate-smart technologies. The Nigerian government recognizes climate-related risk as a major challenge to the success of its policy – the Agricultural Transformation Agenda (ATA) – to transform its agricultural sector, which accounts for more than 40% of its GDP and 70% of its workforce. In 2012, torrential rains in Southwestern Nigeria caused rice farmers to lose crops to floods. In 2013, maize farmers in the north were hit by drought that halved their expected yields. These climate-related shocks can undermine development gains by destroying rural infrastructure and eroding farmers’ productive assets. Even in climaticallyfavourable years, climate risk is one of the main reasons why farmers do not invest in their farms, have limited access to credit, and remain trapped in low income and low productivity farming.
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Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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Well-designed and agricultural insurance can contribute directly to climate resilience. It can also mitigate risk that often acts as a barrier to farmer adoption of climate-smart technologies. The Nigerian government recognizes climate-related risk as a major challenge to the success of its policy – the Agricultural Transformation Agenda (ATA) – to transform its agricultural sector, which accounts for more than 40% of its GDP and 70% of its workforce. In 2012, torrential rains in Southwestern Nigeria caused rice farmers to lose crops to floods. In 2013, maize farmers in the north were hit by drought that halved their expected yields. These climate-related shocks can undermine development gains by destroying rural infrastructure and eroding farmers’ productive assets. Even in climaticallyfavourable years, climate risk is one of the main reasons why farmers do not invest in their farms, have limited access to credit, and remain trapped in low income and low productivity farming.

Socioeconomics Program

Text in english

INT2698

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