Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Chapter CS3. Integrating private businesses in scaling Climate Smart Agriculture

By: Misiko, M.T.
Contributor(s): Kahan, D.G | Stirling, C.
Material type: materialTypeLabelChapterSeries: Working Paper ; No. 135.Publisher: Copenhagen, Denmark: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), 2015Subject(s): Climate-smart agriculture | EnterprisesOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff In: Westermann, O. Reaching more farmers Innovative approaches to scaling up climate-smart agriculture p. 44-49Summary: Scaling is becoming increasingly privatized as technologies become more proprietary and as farmers become more market-oriented (e.g. Kahan 2009). The agricultural landscape is changing rapidly, comprising more complex and formalized input supply and output marketing systems. The role of private businesses is expanding, from mere dealership in inputs to increasingly procuring and selling farm produce together with advice and information. The cost of staying in business is therefore increasingly complex, that also includes technical advisory to client farmers, and feedback provision to their suppliers. To fulfil this more complex role, input dealers require technical and business development competencies and skills to ensure that their business provide quality and timely provision of inputs and materials together with agronomic and marketing advice and information on recommendations for their application and use. Agrodealers require support in business management, marketing and contracts together with knowledge on safety issues amongst others (Kahan 2009). In short, private sector agrodealers cannot stand on their own. The public sector extension services, along with NGOs, CBOs, farmers and research play unique roles supporting them. Public extension systems are critical, yet often strapped for operational budgets and prone to bureaucratic decision making processes. Very few have unallocated program funds available for use by field-level staff, to respond to new farmer demands and increasing farming populations (Swanson 2008). The challenge is how different information and technical advice sources/ channels can be efficiently and sustainably integrated into regulated programs designed to serve these demands and needs. This requires strong public-private-NGO collaboration that builds on the comparative advantage of the various actors involved in research and extension.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection Available
Total holds: 0

Open Access

Scaling is becoming increasingly privatized as technologies become more proprietary and as farmers become more market-oriented (e.g. Kahan 2009). The agricultural landscape is changing rapidly, comprising more complex and formalized input supply and output marketing systems. The role of private businesses is expanding, from mere dealership in inputs to increasingly procuring and selling farm produce together with advice and information. The cost of staying in business is therefore increasingly complex, that also includes technical advisory to client farmers, and feedback provision to their suppliers. To fulfil this more complex role, input dealers require technical and business development competencies and skills to ensure that their business provide quality and timely provision of inputs and materials together with agronomic and marketing advice and information on recommendations for their application and use. Agrodealers require support in business management, marketing and contracts together with knowledge on safety issues amongst others (Kahan 2009). In short, private sector agrodealers cannot stand on their own. The public sector extension services, along with NGOs, CBOs, farmers and research play unique roles supporting them. Public extension systems are critical, yet often strapped for operational budgets and prone to bureaucratic decision making processes. Very few have unallocated program funds available for use by field-level staff, to respond to new farmer demands and increasing farming populations (Swanson 2008). The challenge is how different information and technical advice sources/ channels can be efficiently and sustainably integrated into regulated programs designed to serve these demands and needs. This requires strong public-private-NGO collaboration that builds on the comparative advantage of the various actors involved in research and extension.

Conservation Agriculture Program

Socioeconomics Program

Text in english

INT3368

INT3349

I1706093

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer

baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Monday –Friday 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org