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Chapter. Photosynthetic contribution of ear to grain filling in wheat : comparison of different methodologies for evaluation

By: Sanchez-Bragado, R.
Contributor(s): Araus, J.L | Reynolds, M.P | Molero, G.
Material type: materialTypeLabelChapterPublisher: Mexico : CIMMYT, USAID, MASAGRO, SAGARPA, CONACYT, 2015Subject(s): Seed filling AGROVOC | Wheat In: Proceedings of the International TRIGO Wheat Yield Potential p. 54-55Summary: There is an increasing necessity in raising wheat yield potential and stability (Reynolds & Borlaug 2006; Araus et al. 2008; Reynolds et al. 2011) is increasing in view of the growing challenges imposed by social and climate changes. Moreover, genetic advances fuelled by breeding programs have decreased over recent decades (Reynolds et al. 1996; Araus et al. 2008). There is a need to develop more efficient wheat breeding methodologies, particularly phenotyping strategies, which complement existing (traditional) breeding techniques (Araus et al., 2008). One of the approaches proposed to increase yield potential and improve adaptation to abiotic stresses, such as drought and heat, is to select for higher ear photosynthesis. Hence, ear photosynthesis is thought to play an important role in terms of the source of photoassimilates during grain filling, not only under drought, but also under good agronomical conditions (Araus et al. 1993; Bort et al. 1994; Abbad et al. 2004). Although the photosynthetic contribution of the ear to final grain weight has been widely studied (Araus et al. 1993; Bort et al. 1994; Tambussi et al. 2005, 2007; Maydup et al. 2010; Saeidi et al. 2012), its actual importance in terms of contribution to grain filling is not well understood (Tambussi et al. 2007), which has prevented the settling down of high-throughput phenotyping approaches for this trait. The main objective of this work was to compare different experimental approaches aiming to assess the relative photosynthetic contribution of the ear and the rest of the plant (the culm) to grain filling. Three different techniques were used: inhibition of ear and culm photosynthesis through i) herbicide DCMU application; or ii) by shading each organ; and iii) a non-disturbing approach which compares the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in its natural abundance of assimilates from different plant parts (awns and peduncle) with the δ13C of the mature grains. Several advanced CIMMYT lines were tested under good agronomic conditions.
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Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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There is an increasing necessity in raising wheat yield potential and stability (Reynolds & Borlaug 2006; Araus et al. 2008; Reynolds et al. 2011) is increasing in view of the growing challenges imposed by social and climate changes. Moreover, genetic advances fuelled by breeding programs have decreased over recent decades (Reynolds et al. 1996; Araus et al. 2008). There is a need to develop more efficient wheat breeding methodologies, particularly phenotyping strategies, which complement existing (traditional) breeding techniques (Araus et al., 2008). One of the approaches proposed to increase yield potential and improve adaptation to abiotic stresses, such as drought and heat, is to select for higher ear photosynthesis. Hence, ear photosynthesis is thought to play an important role in terms of the source of photoassimilates during grain filling, not only under drought, but also under good agronomical conditions (Araus et al. 1993; Bort et al. 1994; Abbad et al. 2004). Although the photosynthetic contribution of the ear to final grain weight has been widely studied (Araus et al. 1993; Bort et al. 1994; Tambussi et al. 2005, 2007; Maydup et al. 2010; Saeidi et al. 2012), its actual importance in terms of contribution to grain filling is not well understood (Tambussi et al. 2007), which has prevented the settling down of high-throughput phenotyping approaches for this trait. The main objective of this work was to compare different experimental approaches aiming to assess the relative photosynthetic contribution of the ear and the rest of the plant (the culm) to grain filling. Three different techniques were used: inhibition of ear and culm photosynthesis through i) herbicide DCMU application; or ii) by shading each organ; and iii) a non-disturbing approach which compares the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in its natural abundance of assimilates from different plant parts (awns and peduncle) with the δ13C of the mature grains. Several advanced CIMMYT lines were tested under good agronomic conditions.

Global Wheat Program

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