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Chapter. Genetic diversity of light interception profiles in modern wheat canopies

By: López Castañeda, C.
Contributor(s): Reynolds, M.P | Molero, G.
Material type: materialTypeLabelChapterPublisher: Mexico : CIMMYT, USAID, MASAGRO, SAGARPA, CONACYT, 2015Subject(s): Canopy AGROVOC | Wheat | Plant breeding AGROVOC In: Proceedings of the International TRIGO Wheat Yield Potential p. 47-49Summary: The ideal crop canopy maximizes interception of solar radiation throughout the crop cycle while optimizing the distribution of light. The latter is important because photosynthesis saturates at about half the intensity of direct sunlight. Hence the maximum rates of canopy photosynthesis are achieved by increasing the leaf area index to values typically above three, and arranging leaves in a more erect posture thereby reducing the proportion of leaves in a light saturated state and increasing light penetration. In fact light interception is generally above 95% for most wheat canopies in favourable environments and modern wheat canopies already have erect or semi-erectophile canopies (Araus et al. 1993). However, there may be scope for further genetic alteration of leaf posture, leaf size or density to alter the architecture and hence the in-canopy light characteristics which influences the extent and dynamics of light saturation (Murchie et al. 2009). An area of canopy photosynthesis that has not been addressed in breeding before is the potential to improve the contribution from spikes. Studies were conducted in genetically diverse elite high-yielding spring wheat genotypes to determine light extinction patterns.
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Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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The ideal crop canopy maximizes interception of solar radiation throughout the crop cycle while optimizing the distribution of light. The latter is important because photosynthesis saturates at about half the intensity of direct sunlight. Hence the maximum rates of canopy photosynthesis are achieved by increasing the leaf area index to values typically above three, and arranging leaves in a more erect posture thereby reducing the proportion of leaves in a light saturated state and increasing light penetration. In fact light interception is generally above 95% for most wheat canopies in favourable environments and modern wheat canopies already have erect or semi-erectophile canopies (Araus et al. 1993). However, there may be scope for further genetic alteration of leaf posture, leaf size or density to alter the architecture and hence the in-canopy light characteristics which influences the extent and dynamics of light saturation (Murchie et al. 2009). An area of canopy photosynthesis that has not been addressed in breeding before is the potential to improve the contribution from spikes. Studies were conducted in genetically diverse elite high-yielding spring wheat genotypes to determine light extinction patterns.

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