Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Ensuring the use of sustainable crop management strategies by small wheat farmers in the 21st century

By: Sayre, K.D | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CIMMYT Wheat Special Report (WPSR) ; No. 48.Analytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) : CIMMYT, 1998Description: 40 pages.ISBN: 970-648-025-0.ISSN: 0187-7787.Subject(s): Application rates | Crop management | Cropping systems | Cultivation | Developing Countries | Disease control | Farm management | Fertilizer application | Forecasting | Green manures | Innovation adoption | Pest control | Plant production | Production factors | Research projects | Small farms | Soil improvement | Sowing AGROVOC | Sustainability | Technology transfer | Trends | Weed control | Zero tillage | Bed planting CIMMYT | Crop residues AGROVOC | Conservation tillage AGROVOC | Wheat AGROVOC | Yields AGROVOCOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Virtually all current strategies to implement modern, sustainable crop management production practices involve conservation/zero tillage prior to seeding, some form of crop residue retention and management, fertilizer application methodologies that minimize nutrient losses, and integrated insect, disease and weed management practices that relay on minimal or no use of pesticides. In nearly all instances, the use of these modern, sustainable crop management strategies has by-passed most small farmers (especially small wheat farmers) in developing countries for several reasons, including: 1) the lack of small-scale planters that are compatible with two-wheel or small four-wheel tractors, or with draft animals, and appropriate for sowing into residues in reduced or zero tillage systems; 2) the need of many farmers to remove or pasture crop residues for livestock feed or to remove residues for cooking; 3) the lack of knowledge by small farmers (and most researches) about how to best to apply fertilizers (when and where, with main emphasis on nitrogen fertilizers) to minimize losses while complementing farm level nutrient sources , including farmyard manure/composts and/or green manures, especially when combined with reduced zero tillage systems; and 4) the largely unknown ramifications of these practices, which may modify insect, disease, and weed incidence. Research is underway at different institutions in several countries to address these problems and help to ensure that sustainable crop management practices relevant to small wheat farmers will be come a reality. Some of these efforts will be discussed here, including ongoing work at CIMMYT on the application of bed-planting in wheat production systems.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection Look under series title (Browse shelf) 1 Available 624510
Total holds: 0

Virtually all current strategies to implement modern, sustainable crop management production practices involve conservation/zero tillage prior to seeding, some form of crop residue retention and management, fertilizer application methodologies that minimize nutrient losses, and integrated insect, disease and weed management practices that relay on minimal or no use of pesticides. In nearly all instances, the use of these modern, sustainable crop management strategies has by-passed most small farmers (especially small wheat farmers) in developing countries for several reasons, including: 1) the lack of small-scale planters that are compatible with two-wheel or small four-wheel tractors, or with draft animals, and appropriate for sowing into residues in reduced or zero tillage systems; 2) the need of many farmers to remove or pasture crop residues for livestock feed or to remove residues for cooking; 3) the lack of knowledge by small farmers (and most researches) about how to best to apply fertilizers (when and where, with main emphasis on nitrogen fertilizers) to minimize losses while complementing farm level nutrient sources , including farmyard manure/composts and/or green manures, especially when combined with reduced zero tillage systems; and 4) the largely unknown ramifications of these practices, which may modify insect, disease, and weed incidence. Research is underway at different institutions in several countries to address these problems and help to ensure that sustainable crop management practices relevant to small wheat farmers will be come a reality. Some of these efforts will be discussed here, including ongoing work at CIMMYT on the application of bed-planting in wheat production systems.

Conservation Agriculture Program

English

CIMPUBS=26 SCANED DEC 08 (Digitalizar)|Google-Oct-08 Sent printed format|9901|AGRIS 9901|R98-99CIMPU|DSpace 1

CSAY01

CIMMYT Publications Collection

67141.jpg

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Click on an image to view it in the image viewer

baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org