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The farming systems of the Texizapan watershed, Sierra de Santa Marta, Veracruz, Mexico

By: Rice, E.
Contributor(s): Erenstein, O | Godínez, L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CIMMYT NRG Copublication ; 98-01.Analytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico : CIMMYT : PSSM, 1998Description: vi, 32 pages.ISBN: 970-648-010-2.Subject(s): Agricultural development | Cropping systems | Maize | Plant production | Sustainability | Mexico AGROVOCOnline resources: Open Access through Dspace Summary: The main farming systems of the Texizapan watershed in southern Veracruz, Mexico (200-1,640 meters above sea level) were characterized through a formal survey in 1995. Farm-level data included an inventory of resources (human, land, and capital), their use, and resource flows (both intra- and inter-household). Field-level data, particularly on input use and production, were gathered for the major crops, maize and coffee. Maize was the main food crop, grown by all households. Coffee was the main cash crop, but production was limited to higher elevations. The maize cropping system was relatively land extensive and labor intensive; all practice were entirely manual. External input use was relatively limited, emphasizing herbicides. Half the farmers reported using fertilizers, but levels were generally low and use of improved maize varieties rare. All farmers used burning as a land preparation practice prior to maize planting. Maize yields in the main season averaged less than a 1 t/ha. Maize was generally intercropped with beans and other crops, although intercrop yields also appeared low. Maize producttion in the minor season was more widespread than previously thought, although yields were extremely low. Given the low yields, high labor input, and limited external input use, returns to maize cultivation were low. Even so, maize cultivation was expected to continue in the study area, in view of the households' consumption needs and limited alternative income opportunities. Half the sample reported being net consumers of maize, and the need to purchase beans - the major protein source - was even more widespread. In view of the limited number of other food sources available locally and constraints on disposable income, the nutritional status of the households warrants closer attention. The major challenge facing producers was that of sustainably raising productivity to provide for consumption and other needs.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection Look under series title (Browse shelf) 1 Available 624408
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The main farming systems of the Texizapan watershed in southern Veracruz, Mexico (200-1,640 meters above sea level) were characterized through a formal survey in 1995. Farm-level data included an inventory of resources (human, land, and capital), their use, and resource flows (both intra- and inter-household). Field-level data, particularly on input use and production, were gathered for the major crops, maize and coffee. Maize was the main food crop, grown by all households. Coffee was the main cash crop, but production was limited to higher elevations. The maize cropping system was relatively land extensive and labor intensive; all practice were entirely manual. External input use was relatively limited, emphasizing herbicides. Half the farmers reported using fertilizers, but levels were generally low and use of improved maize varieties rare. All farmers used burning as a land preparation practice prior to maize planting. Maize yields in the main season averaged less than a 1 t/ha. Maize was generally intercropped with beans and other crops, although intercrop yields also appeared low. Maize producttion in the minor season was more widespread than previously thought, although yields were extremely low. Given the low yields, high labor input, and limited external input use, returns to maize cultivation were low. Even so, maize cultivation was expected to continue in the study area, in view of the households' consumption needs and limited alternative income opportunities. Half the sample reported being net consumers of maize, and the need to purchase beans - the major protein source - was even more widespread. In view of the limited number of other food sources available locally and constraints on disposable income, the nutritional status of the households warrants closer attention. The major challenge facing producers was that of sustainably raising productivity to provide for consumption and other needs.

Socioeconomics Program

Text in English

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CIMMYT Publications Collection

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