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An agronomic and economic analysis of a long-term wheat-based crop rotation trial in Ethiopia

By: Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) | Tanner, D.G.
Contributor(s): Asefa Taa [coaut.] | Regassa Ensermu [coaut.] | Verkuijl, H [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) CIMMYT : 1999ISBN: 92-9146-058-3.Subject(s): Agronomic characters | Cropping systems | Economic analysis | Ethiopia | Fertilizer application | Hordeum vulgare | Prices | Profitability | Soil types | Statistical analysis | Vicia faba AGROVOC | CIMMYT | Rotational - Término tomado de AGROVOC -- Término tomado de AGROVOC | Triticum aestivum AGROVOCSummary: Cropping systems in the- Ethiopian highlands consist primarily of cereals in rotation with grain legume and oilseed crops; the proportional allocation among crop species varies with altitude, rainfall, and soil type. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) tends to dominate in the highest altitudinal zones, while bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is more common at medium altitudes on well-drained soils. A trial was established in 1992 at the Kulumsa and Asasa research sites in southeastern Ethiopia to evaluate interactions among wheat- based cropping sequences and annua1 app1ications of inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Rotational crops included Ethiopian rapeseed (Brassica carinata), faba bean (Vicia faba), and barley. The results indicated significant rotational effects on wheat grain yield (GY), including enhanced GY in dicot vs. cereal rotations, in two year vs. three year rotations, in first year wheat after any break crop, and in rotation with faba bean vs. rapeseed. Interactions among cropping sequences and N and P application were also significant. Response to N was markedly reduced in two year rotations with any break crop, in first year wheat after any break crop, and after faba bean, in particular. Conversely, P response was occasionally enhanced in two year rotations and in the first wheat crop after any break crop, and in dicot-based rotations, particularly with faba bean. Presumably, this enhancement was the result of simultaneous improvement in soil N status and a reduction in wheat root pathogen and grass weed populations in these cropping sequences. Across all fertilizer and seed price scenarios considered in the economic analysis, the faba bean-wheat 3 year rotation (with an annual application of 60 kg N/ha) was economically optimal at Kulumsa; however, this recommendation may have to be modified to minimize the anticipated long-term impact of mining of soil P. In the drier environment at Asasa, the faba bean-wheat 3 year rotation (with an annual application of 30 kg N and 20 kg P/ha) was economically optimal. Alternate recommendations are discussed for farmers with lower levels of cash to invest in crop production.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection Look under series title (Browse shelf) 1 Available V629146
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Cropping systems in the- Ethiopian highlands consist primarily of cereals in rotation with grain legume and oilseed crops; the proportional allocation among crop species varies with altitude, rainfall, and soil type. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) tends to dominate in the highest altitudinal zones, while bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is more common at medium altitudes on well-drained soils. A trial was established in 1992 at the Kulumsa and Asasa research sites in southeastern Ethiopia to evaluate interactions among wheat- based cropping sequences and annua1 app1ications of inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Rotational crops included Ethiopian rapeseed (Brassica carinata), faba bean (Vicia faba), and barley. The results indicated significant rotational effects on wheat grain yield (GY), including enhanced GY in dicot vs. cereal rotations, in two year vs. three year rotations, in first year wheat after any break crop, and in rotation with faba bean vs. rapeseed. Interactions among cropping sequences and N and P application were also significant. Response to N was markedly reduced in two year rotations with any break crop, in first year wheat after any break crop, and after faba bean, in particular. Conversely, P response was occasionally enhanced in two year rotations and in the first wheat crop after any break crop, and in dicot-based rotations, particularly with faba bean. Presumably, this enhancement was the result of simultaneous improvement in soil N status and a reduction in wheat root pathogen and grass weed populations in these cropping sequences. Across all fertilizer and seed price scenarios considered in the economic analysis, the faba bean-wheat 3 year rotation (with an annual application of 60 kg N/ha) was economically optimal at Kulumsa; however, this recommendation may have to be modified to minimize the anticipated long-term impact of mining of soil P. In the drier environment at Asasa, the faba bean-wheat 3 year rotation (with an annual application of 30 kg N and 20 kg P/ha) was economically optimal. Alternate recommendations are discussed for farmers with lower levels of cash to invest in crop production.

English

0007|AGRIS 0101|R99-00CIMPU|AL-Wheat Program|AL-Economics Program

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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