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Survival strategies of poor women in urban Africa: the case of Zambia

By: O'Reilly, C | Natural Resources Inst., Chatham (United Kingdom).
Contributor(s): Gordon, A [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: 1995ISBN: 0-85954-404-4. ISSN 0967-0548.Subject(s): Africa | Africa south of Sahara | Anglophone africa | Enterprises | Farms | Investment, finance and credit | Labour and employment | Living standards | Mankind | Rural sociology | Small enterprises | Social structure | Southern AfricaDDC classification: 96-104982 In: NRI Socio-economic Series (United Kingdom).- Natural Resources Institute Socio-economic Series (United Kingdom). no. 10 Chatham (United Kingdom). NRI. 1995. 36 pSummary: Urban poverty is increasing alongside growing urban populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Women constitute a significant proportion of the urban poor but their role is often neglected by development projects. Research was undertaken with the aim of providing better definition and targeting of project interventions. Survival strategies include migration, marriage and fertility, education, links with rural areas, social networks, saving and borrowing, and home production through urban agriculture. Most women also engage directly in some form of income-earning activity. The scale of these activities varies widely but for the vast majority of poor women, it is most often the vending of foodstuffs. Poor women depend on purchased natural resources products for family food and fuel supplies, and are also involved in the trading of these products. Ways in which women's livelihood strategies could be strengthened are discussed and the need for a multi-dimensional initiatives is emphasized. Credit, confidence-building, access to information, and specific income-generating activities are highlighted as major requirementsCollection: AGRIS Collection
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Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

AGRIS Collection 96-104982 (Browse shelf) Available
Total holds: 0

2 appendices; 24 ref. Summary (En) Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (UK)

Urban poverty is increasing alongside growing urban populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Women constitute a significant proportion of the urban poor but their role is often neglected by development projects. Research was undertaken with the aim of providing better definition and targeting of project interventions. Survival strategies include migration, marriage and fertility, education, links with rural areas, social networks, saving and borrowing, and home production through urban agriculture. Most women also engage directly in some form of income-earning activity. The scale of these activities varies widely but for the vast majority of poor women, it is most often the vending of foodstuffs. Poor women depend on purchased natural resources products for family food and fuel supplies, and are also involved in the trading of these products. Ways in which women's livelihood strategies could be strengthened are discussed and the need for a multi-dimensional initiatives is emphasized. Credit, confidence-building, access to information, and specific income-generating activities are highlighted as major requirements

English

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