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La tolerancia al anegamiento en el trigo: Problemas relacionados con el fitomejoramiento

By: Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico) | Ginkel, M. Van.
Contributor(s): Boru, G [coaut.] | Kholi, M.M.|Martino, D [eds.] | Sayre, K.D [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: la Estanzuela (Uruguay) INIA|CIMMYT : 1998ISBN: 9974-7586-0-2.Subject(s): Environmental factors | Plant response AGROVOC | Plant water relations | Research projects | Selection | Variety trials | Water uptake | Waterlogging | Yield factors | Yield increases | CIMMYT | INIA | Wheat AGROVOC | Yields AGROVOC | Plant breeding AGROVOCDDC classification: 633.1158 Summary: The water logging effects approximately 10 million ha in the world. In Ethiopia, early water logging due to excess of precipitation is common in the black vertisole soils. Here, the farmers seed late to escape water logging. More than a third of the areas under irrigation in the world (Indo-Gangetic plains of India, the valleys of Yangtze and Yellow rivers in China and the Nile river delta of Egypt) suffer from the excess of water due to the absence of adequate drainage systems. Wheat farmers in the rice regions also tend to irrigate in excess. The water logging is also a problem in parts of Australia, United States, Canada and United Kingdom.||Water logging effects the exchange of gases in the soil. The lower availability of oxygen results in reduced absorption of the nutrients, especially nitrogen. The rate of photosynthesis is lowered due to closing of the stomata. The N is translocated to the younger leaves from the older ones, which turn chlorotic and die. The final number of tillers is reduced and the flowers are male sterile or completely sterile. This affects the grain yield severely.||CIMMYT started its recent research effort to study tolerance to water logging in 1989. A large number (1344) of advanced lines were seeded under waterlogged conditions from the emergence till the end of the crop cycle. More than 98% of the lines did not produce any grain. Of the 29 lines that produced some grain, only 14 had grains of acceptable weight. These were identified to come from three crosses with exceptional level of survival: DUCULA, PARULA/SARA and VEE/MYNA. The subsequent trials confirmed their tolerance to water logging. These crosses appear to have more aerenquima than the sensitive genotypes. The aerenquima can transport oxygen from the aerial tissues to the roots. No maternal or cytoplasmic effects were observed in these wheats or the sensitive genotypes. Although genetic variability in the tolerance to water logging has been observed, it should not be considered as the best long-term strategy. Only a better irrigation and drainage system will provide a definite solution to this problem.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.1158 KOH (Browse shelf) 1 Available F628207
Book CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.1158 KOH (Browse shelf) 2 Available F633514
Total holds: 0

The water logging effects approximately 10 million ha in the world. In Ethiopia, early water logging due to excess of precipitation is common in the black vertisole soils. Here, the farmers seed late to escape water logging. More than a third of the areas under irrigation in the world (Indo-Gangetic plains of India, the valleys of Yangtze and Yellow rivers in China and the Nile river delta of Egypt) suffer from the excess of water due to the absence of adequate drainage systems. Wheat farmers in the rice regions also tend to irrigate in excess. The water logging is also a problem in parts of Australia, United States, Canada and United Kingdom.||Water logging effects the exchange of gases in the soil. The lower availability of oxygen results in reduced absorption of the nutrients, especially nitrogen. The rate of photosynthesis is lowered due to closing of the stomata. The N is translocated to the younger leaves from the older ones, which turn chlorotic and die. The final number of tillers is reduced and the flowers are male sterile or completely sterile. This affects the grain yield severely.||CIMMYT started its recent research effort to study tolerance to water logging in 1989. A large number (1344) of advanced lines were seeded under waterlogged conditions from the emergence till the end of the crop cycle. More than 98% of the lines did not produce any grain. Of the 29 lines that produced some grain, only 14 had grains of acceptable weight. These were identified to come from three crosses with exceptional level of survival: DUCULA, PARULA/SARA and VEE/MYNA. The subsequent trials confirmed their tolerance to water logging. These crosses appear to have more aerenquima than the sensitive genotypes. The aerenquima can transport oxygen from the aerial tissues to the roots. No maternal or cytoplasmic effects were observed in these wheats or the sensitive genotypes. Although genetic variability in the tolerance to water logging has been observed, it should not be considered as the best long-term strategy. Only a better irrigation and drainage system will provide a definite solution to this problem.

Conservation Agriculture Program

Spanish

9911|R99-00BOOK|R97-98PRESE|EE|AGRIS 0102

Jose Juan Caballero

CSAY01

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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