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Epidemiology of seedborne Stagonospora nodorum: A case study on New York winter wheat

By: Shah, D.A | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Bergstrom, G.C [coaut.] | Ginkel, M. van|McNab, A.|Krupinsky, J [eds.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 1999ISBN: 970-648-035-8.Subject(s): Infection | New York | Pathogens | Plant diseases | Stagonospora | USA | Winter crops | CIMMYT | TriticumDDC classification: 632.4 Summary: Stagonospora nodorum blotch is the most important component of the foliar disease complex that attacks New York winter wheat. Ascospores of the teleomorph Phaeosphaeria nodorum are not commonly observed in New York, where wheat is generally preceded in sequence by several years of nonhost, rotational crops. Wheat seed infection by Stagonospora nodorum is common, the extent and range depending mainly on rainfall during the production season. Transmission of the pathogen from infected seeds to coleoptiles can approach 100% over a wide soil temperature range; transmission to the first leaves is less than 50% and is most efficient at soil temperatures below 17 ºC. Nevertheless, under the high densities at which wheat is sown, a significant number of infected seedlings per unit area can originate from relatively low initial seed infection levels and transmission efficiencies. Stagonospora nodorum blotch epidemics arising from infected seed potentially can be managed by reducing initial seedborne inoculum and its transmission. Wheat cultivars exhibit differential responses to infection of seed by S. nodorum, and this seed resistance appears to be under genetic control separate from foliar resistance. Breeding for reduced frequencies of seed infection and transmission, along with improved disease management in seed production fields and the application of seed fungicides, may comprise an effective integrated strategy for managing stagonospora nodorum blotch in wheat production systems similar to that in New York.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 632.4 GIN (Browse shelf) 1 Available 1A628903
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Stagonospora nodorum blotch is the most important component of the foliar disease complex that attacks New York winter wheat. Ascospores of the teleomorph Phaeosphaeria nodorum are not commonly observed in New York, where wheat is generally preceded in sequence by several years of nonhost, rotational crops. Wheat seed infection by Stagonospora nodorum is common, the extent and range depending mainly on rainfall during the production season. Transmission of the pathogen from infected seeds to coleoptiles can approach 100% over a wide soil temperature range; transmission to the first leaves is less than 50% and is most efficient at soil temperatures below 17 ºC. Nevertheless, under the high densities at which wheat is sown, a significant number of infected seedlings per unit area can originate from relatively low initial seed infection levels and transmission efficiencies. Stagonospora nodorum blotch epidemics arising from infected seed potentially can be managed by reducing initial seedborne inoculum and its transmission. Wheat cultivars exhibit differential responses to infection of seed by S. nodorum, and this seed resistance appears to be under genetic control separate from foliar resistance. Breeding for reduced frequencies of seed infection and transmission, along with improved disease management in seed production fields and the application of seed fungicides, may comprise an effective integrated strategy for managing stagonospora nodorum blotch in wheat production systems similar to that in New York.

English

9910|AGRIS 0001

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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