Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Green manuring crops in a maize based communal area, Mangwende: Experiences using participatory approaches

By: Chibudu, C | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Waddington, S.R.|Murwira, H.K.|Kumwenda, J.D.T.|Hikwa, D.|Tagwira, F [eds.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Harare (Zimbabwe) Soil Fert Net|CIMMYT : 1998ISBN: 970-648-006-4.Subject(s): Green manures | Intercropping | Trials | CIMMYT | Soil Fert Net | Rotational - Término tomado de AGROVOC -- Término tomado de AGROVOC | Zea mays AGROVOC | Soil fertility AGROVOC | Farming systems AGROVOCDDC classification: 631.45 Summary: This paper reports on how green manuring trials were started, implemented and evaluated in Mangwende communal area from 1992 to 1996. The trials followed an impact study carried out in 1992 by the Farming Systems Research Unit which revealed that soil fertility technologies developed in the 1980s had not been adopted (Chikura, Mudhara, Mombeshora, Chibudu and Jeranyama, 1992). Farmers were not involved in problem identification, trial design, implementation and evaluation with the older work. Hence a Participatory Rural Appraisal exercise was conducted with farmers to identify problems and opportunities in soil fertility management. Farmers identified problems of low soil fertility and low maize yields, coupled with cash constraints for buying fertilizers. The poor soils, known as 'shapa', were associated with Striga (witchweed). Farmers, researchers and extensionists formulated and set up trials to screen legumes that could improve soil fertility, reduce Striga infestation and improve maize yields. The legumes tested were velvet bean, sunnhemp, cowpea and dolichos and were planted in either rotations or intercropping systems with maize.|Results showed that green manure crops such as velvet bean, sunnhemp and cowpea could improve soil fertility, reduce Striga incidence and subsequently increasing maize yields. Farmers preferred to use velvet bean for improving soils in rotation but not intercropped with maize because it choked the maize making it difficult to harvest the maize crop. Cowpea was preferred by farmers for Striga control because it also provided grain for food. Contributions of green manures to the soil nutrient status require investigation. Seed production by the green manures and their storage should be clarified to have a sustainable green manuring programme. The need to strengthen farmer research capabilities was identified.|Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 631.45 WAD (Browse shelf) 1 Available L628739
Total holds: 0

This paper reports on how green manuring trials were started, implemented and evaluated in Mangwende communal area from 1992 to 1996. The trials followed an impact study carried out in 1992 by the Farming Systems Research Unit which revealed that soil fertility technologies developed in the 1980s had not been adopted (Chikura, Mudhara, Mombeshora, Chibudu and Jeranyama, 1992). Farmers were not involved in problem identification, trial design, implementation and evaluation with the older work. Hence a Participatory Rural Appraisal exercise was conducted with farmers to identify problems and opportunities in soil fertility management. Farmers identified problems of low soil fertility and low maize yields, coupled with cash constraints for buying fertilizers. The poor soils, known as 'shapa', were associated with Striga (witchweed). Farmers, researchers and extensionists formulated and set up trials to screen legumes that could improve soil fertility, reduce Striga infestation and improve maize yields. The legumes tested were velvet bean, sunnhemp, cowpea and dolichos and were planted in either rotations or intercropping systems with maize.|Results showed that green manure crops such as velvet bean, sunnhemp and cowpea could improve soil fertility, reduce Striga incidence and subsequently increasing maize yields. Farmers preferred to use velvet bean for improving soils in rotation but not intercropped with maize because it choked the maize making it difficult to harvest the maize crop. Cowpea was preferred by farmers for Striga control because it also provided grain for food. Contributions of green manures to the soil nutrient status require investigation. Seed production by the green manures and their storage should be clarified to have a sustainable green manuring programme. The need to strengthen farmer research capabilities was identified.|

English

9906|AGRIS 9902|R98-99ANALY

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Monday –Friday 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org