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Toward drought tolerant maize in South Africa

By: Magson, J | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Edmeades, G.O.|Banziger, M.|Mickelson, H.R.|Pena-Valdivia, C.B [eds.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 1997ISBN: 968-6923-93-4.Subject(s): Climatic factors | Drought resistance | Drought stress AGROVOC | Plant population AGROVOC | South Africa | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Genotypes AGROVOC | Plant breeding AGROVOCDDC classification: 633.153 Summary: The South African maize production area is subject to a rainfall gradient from east to west. As a result, various row spacings are used ranging from 0.9 m in the east, 1.5 m in intermediate areas and 2.0 m in the west. Plant populations range from 40,000 plants/ha in the east to 15,000 plants/ha in the west. Most maize is produced in the relatively dry western regions, whereas five percent of the total maize production is obtained from the Kwazulu-Natal province where rainfall approximates that of First World agriculture. A further complicating factor is the occurrence of a twenty-year rainfall cycle, where a ten-year period of relatively high rainfall is followed by ten years of comparatively low rainfall. Smaller wet and dry cycles occur within the ten year periods. Even during years of adequate rainfall, production is often limited by the effect of midsummer drought during the vulnerable flowering period of maize. Local maize hybrids are characteristically prolific, allowing for both ears to be filled under favourable conditions and at least one ear to be produced under sub-optimal conditions. Prolificacy together with anthesis-silking synchronization are the two primary characteristics selected to improve drought tolerance in maize genotypes. In the past, a breeding program was followed with the objective of improving maize genotypes for drought tolerance. At present, the breeding program aims to incorporate drought tolerance characteristics from exotic germplasm into local breeding material.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.153 EDM (Browse shelf) 1 Available 3E624179
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The South African maize production area is subject to a rainfall gradient from east to west. As a result, various row spacings are used ranging from 0.9 m in the east, 1.5 m in intermediate areas and 2.0 m in the west. Plant populations range from 40,000 plants/ha in the east to 15,000 plants/ha in the west. Most maize is produced in the relatively dry western regions, whereas five percent of the total maize production is obtained from the Kwazulu-Natal province where rainfall approximates that of First World agriculture. A further complicating factor is the occurrence of a twenty-year rainfall cycle, where a ten-year period of relatively high rainfall is followed by ten years of comparatively low rainfall. Smaller wet and dry cycles occur within the ten year periods. Even during years of adequate rainfall, production is often limited by the effect of midsummer drought during the vulnerable flowering period of maize. Local maize hybrids are characteristically prolific, allowing for both ears to be filled under favourable conditions and at least one ear to be produced under sub-optimal conditions. Prolificacy together with anthesis-silking synchronization are the two primary characteristics selected to improve drought tolerance in maize genotypes. In the past, a breeding program was followed with the objective of improving maize genotypes for drought tolerance. At present, the breeding program aims to incorporate drought tolerance characteristics from exotic germplasm into local breeding material.

English

9802|AGRIS 9702

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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