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Choices among breeding procedures and strategies for developing stress tolerant maize germplasm

By: Vasal, S.K | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Beck, D.L [coaut.] | Cordova, H.S [coaut.] | Edmeades, G.O [coaut.] | Edmeades, G.O.|Banziger, M.|Mickelson, H.R.|Peña-Valdivia, C.B [eds.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 1997ISBN: 968-6923-93-4.Subject(s): Breeding methods | Drought resistance | Drought stress AGROVOC | Germplasm | Recurrent selection | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOC | Plant breeding AGROVOCDDC classification: 633.153 Summary: Abiotic stresses, particularly those related to water and nitrogen, are widely distributed and may occur at practically all stages of crop growth. Improvement efforts through breeding are rather limited for such traits, and perhaps only international agricultural research centers, the larger private seed companies, and a few strong national programs have the necessary resources and manpower to pursue such research efficiently. In the absence of major genes, the breeding of such traits is difficult, and requires some skill in managing selection environments. Variation for stress traits has been observed in maize populations under improvement by recurrent selection, as well as among inbred lines and hybrids derived from those populations. recurrent selection procedures for improving stress tolerance characteristics have been successfully demonstrated. Choices among various kinds of breeding procedures appropriate at different stages of the improvement process are outlined, with the appropriate time to switch from one procedure to another indicated. The merits and drawbacks of procedures involving testers in intensifying such traits are discussed. The usefulness of selecting for hybrid-oriented features in stress-tolerant populations is emphasized, as tolerance to inbreeding is itself a valuable source of general stress tolerance. The integration of selection for stress tolerance traits in the on-going improvement process is emphasized. Relative efficiency and cost-effectiveness of recurrent selection procedures are compared with evaluating elite germplasm (particularly inbreds). Results to date suggest that alleles related to stress tolerance are present in most elite maize populations (and hence in any group of inbred lines) at a relatively low frequency, and that controlled stress environments play a key part in their identification. Efficient inbred line development procedures will be indicated, and alternate strategies involving inbreeding at high plant density will be suggested to improve secondary traits known to increase stress tolerance. Finally, cost- effective procedures and strategies most appropriate for breeders operating in developing countries are emphasized.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.153 EDM (Browse shelf) 1 Available 2N624179
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Abiotic stresses, particularly those related to water and nitrogen, are widely distributed and may occur at practically all stages of crop growth. Improvement efforts through breeding are rather limited for such traits, and perhaps only international agricultural research centers, the larger private seed companies, and a few strong national programs have the necessary resources and manpower to pursue such research efficiently. In the absence of major genes, the breeding of such traits is difficult, and requires some skill in managing selection environments. Variation for stress traits has been observed in maize populations under improvement by recurrent selection, as well as among inbred lines and hybrids derived from those populations. recurrent selection procedures for improving stress tolerance characteristics have been successfully demonstrated. Choices among various kinds of breeding procedures appropriate at different stages of the improvement process are outlined, with the appropriate time to switch from one procedure to another indicated. The merits and drawbacks of procedures involving testers in intensifying such traits are discussed. The usefulness of selecting for hybrid-oriented features in stress-tolerant populations is emphasized, as tolerance to inbreeding is itself a valuable source of general stress tolerance. The integration of selection for stress tolerance traits in the on-going improvement process is emphasized. Relative efficiency and cost-effectiveness of recurrent selection procedures are compared with evaluating elite germplasm (particularly inbreds). Results to date suggest that alleles related to stress tolerance are present in most elite maize populations (and hence in any group of inbred lines) at a relatively low frequency, and that controlled stress environments play a key part in their identification. Efficient inbred line development procedures will be indicated, and alternate strategies involving inbreeding at high plant density will be suggested to improve secondary traits known to increase stress tolerance. Finally, cost- effective procedures and strategies most appropriate for breeders operating in developing countries are emphasized.

English

9802|AGRIS 9702|anterior|R97-98PROCE|FINAL9798

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org