Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Sustaining host plant resistance derived through conventional and biotechnological means

By: Maredia, K.M | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Mihm, J.A [ed.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 1997ISBN: 968-6923-79-9.Subject(s): Biotechnology | Hosts | Pest control | Pest insects | Pest resistance | Transgenic plants | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOCDDC classification: 633.153 Summary: Globally, during the last four decades, large investments and long-term research efforts have been put into plant breeding to develop pest resistant varieties and hybrids of crop plants to substitute for the use of toxic chemical pesticides. More recently, new tools of biotechnology have been added to the plant breeding programs to speed up this process. Many pest resistant varieties and hybrids have been released, and in a few years, genetically engineered transgenic varieties and hybrids are expected to be commercialized and released worldwide. Pests can adapt to any management tactic depending on the selection pressure exerted on them, so deployment strategies must be designed and implemented to delay or prevent the breakdown of resistance. Some of these strategies may include use of multiple genes, combining the host plant resistance (HPR) derived through conventional and biotechnological means to pyramid or stack resistance genes, rotation or alternation of genes, use of different gene promoters, and manipulation in the levels of expression (spatial and temporal) of genes. In addition, these HPR deployment strategies must be integrated into an overall integrated pest management (IPM) program that incorporates multiple tactics (cultural, biological, mechanical, chemical, etc.) to diversify pest mortality sources and reduce subsequent selection pressure on the pests. Pest resistance management must be viewed with the context of IPM. If IPM is successfully adopted and implemented at a community or landscape level, the objective of resistance management will be automatically achieved. Hence, IPM should become a part of national agricultural policy.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.153 MIH (Browse shelf) 1 Available 1A623915
Total holds: 0

Globally, during the last four decades, large investments and long-term research efforts have been put into plant breeding to develop pest resistant varieties and hybrids of crop plants to substitute for the use of toxic chemical pesticides. More recently, new tools of biotechnology have been added to the plant breeding programs to speed up this process. Many pest resistant varieties and hybrids have been released, and in a few years, genetically engineered transgenic varieties and hybrids are expected to be commercialized and released worldwide. Pests can adapt to any management tactic depending on the selection pressure exerted on them, so deployment strategies must be designed and implemented to delay or prevent the breakdown of resistance. Some of these strategies may include use of multiple genes, combining the host plant resistance (HPR) derived through conventional and biotechnological means to pyramid or stack resistance genes, rotation or alternation of genes, use of different gene promoters, and manipulation in the levels of expression (spatial and temporal) of genes. In addition, these HPR deployment strategies must be integrated into an overall integrated pest management (IPM) program that incorporates multiple tactics (cultural, biological, mechanical, chemical, etc.) to diversify pest mortality sources and reduce subsequent selection pressure on the pests. Pest resistance management must be viewed with the context of IPM. If IPM is successfully adopted and implemented at a community or landscape level, the objective of resistance management will be automatically achieved. Hence, IPM should become a part of national agricultural policy.

English

9711|AGRIS 9702

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Monday –Friday 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org