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Developing maize with resistance to European corn borer

By: Sagers, J | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): Barrett, L [coaut.] | Bolan, B [coaut.] | Edwards, M [coaut.] | Garrett, C [coaut.] | Mettler, I [coaut.] | Mies, D [coaut.] | Mihm, J.A [ed.] | Wang, A [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Mexico, DF (Mexico) CIMMYT : 1997ISBN: 968-6923-79-9.Subject(s): Breeding methods | Crop losses | Ostrinia nubilalis | Pest insects | Pest resistance | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Hybrids AGROVOCDDC classification: 633.153 Summary: The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis Hubner, causes hundreds of millions of US dollars in crop losses in the United States and Europe. With these large losses in mind, Northrup King began a multifaceted approach to develop commercial hybrids with resistance to ECB damage. A combination of conventional breeding tactics, molecular marker assisted breeding and transgenic technology have been employed to develop long lasting, effective resistance to this pest. Successes have been made using conventional pedigree breeding with an emphasis on ECB resistance, high yield, and good agronomic health. However, conventional breeding relies on artificial infesting with ECB, and it is resource intensive. Thus, we have actively pursued molecular-marker assisted breeding for stalk tunneling resistance to ECB. Molecular marker assisted selection allows 1) advances in selection in years with low ECB damage in the field; 2) more than one selection cycle in a year; 3) use of effective backcross breeding tactics for complexly inherited traits; and 4) reduced field evaluation. Transgenic technology has allowed the production of hybrid corn containing an insecticidal gene from Bacillus thuringiensis Kurstaki. During three years of field testing, corn plants containing this gene have provided excellent full-season control of ECB larvae. The combination of conventional breeding, molecular marker assisted breeding, and transgenic technology will result in stable, highly insect resistant hybrids. These should help us manage ECB and perhaps other lepidopteran pests into the future.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.153 MIH (Browse shelf) 1 Available Y623915
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The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis Hubner, causes hundreds of millions of US dollars in crop losses in the United States and Europe. With these large losses in mind, Northrup King began a multifaceted approach to develop commercial hybrids with resistance to ECB damage. A combination of conventional breeding tactics, molecular marker assisted breeding and transgenic technology have been employed to develop long lasting, effective resistance to this pest. Successes have been made using conventional pedigree breeding with an emphasis on ECB resistance, high yield, and good agronomic health. However, conventional breeding relies on artificial infesting with ECB, and it is resource intensive. Thus, we have actively pursued molecular-marker assisted breeding for stalk tunneling resistance to ECB. Molecular marker assisted selection allows 1) advances in selection in years with low ECB damage in the field; 2) more than one selection cycle in a year; 3) use of effective backcross breeding tactics for complexly inherited traits; and 4) reduced field evaluation. Transgenic technology has allowed the production of hybrid corn containing an insecticidal gene from Bacillus thuringiensis Kurstaki. During three years of field testing, corn plants containing this gene have provided excellent full-season control of ECB larvae. The combination of conventional breeding, molecular marker assisted breeding, and transgenic technology will result in stable, highly insect resistant hybrids. These should help us manage ECB and perhaps other lepidopteran pests into the future.

English

9711|AGRIS 9702

Jose Juan Caballero

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org