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Household access to water and choice of treatment methods: empirical evidencefrom Bhutan

By: Rahut, D.B.
Contributor(s): Behera, B [coaut.] | Ali, A [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2015ISSN: 2212-6082.Subject(s): Drinking water | Education | Gender AGROVOC | Water quality | Wealth In: Water Resources and Rural Development v. 5, p. 1-16Summary: We examine household access to water for domestic consumption and the water-treatment methods adopted in Bhutan, using data from the Bhutan Living Standard Survey (BLSS) 2012. The proportion of households having access to piped water in their home for domestic consumption has increased since 2003, while the use of wells and natural sources such as springs, lakes and rivers has declined over the years. The pattern of distribution of water sources and access to them across income groups shows that wealthier households in both rural and urban areas have access to safer water sources than their poorer counterparts. We find that education and household income are strong determinants of the choice of safe and secure access to water. Rural households tend to use more traditional water sources, such as springs, wells, rivers or ponds, compared to their urban counterparts.Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
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Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection Available
Total holds: 0

Peer-review: No - Yes | http://www.elsevier.com/journals/water-resources-and-rural-development/2212-6082?generatepdf=true

We examine household access to water for domestic consumption and the water-treatment methods adopted in Bhutan, using data from the Bhutan Living Standard Survey (BLSS) 2012. The proportion of households having access to piped water in their home for domestic consumption has increased since 2003, while the use of wells and natural sources such as springs, lakes and rivers has declined over the years. The pattern of distribution of water sources and access to them across income groups shows that wealthier households in both rural and urban areas have access to safer water sources than their poorer counterparts. We find that education and household income are strong determinants of the choice of safe and secure access to water. Rural households tend to use more traditional water sources, such as springs, wells, rivers or ponds, compared to their urban counterparts.

Non-CRP

Socioeconomics Program

English

CIMMYT Informa 2015|Elsevier

INT3364|I1706046

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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