Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Declining agricultural productivity and global food security

By: Dar, W.D.
Contributor(s): Gowda, C.L.L [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2013ISSN: 1542-7528.Subject(s): Climate change impact | Global food security | Rainfed agriculture | Sustainable agriculture In: Journal of Crop Improvement v. 27, no. 2, p. 242-254Summary: It is imperative that the world's farmlands become the frontline for the battle to feed the projected 9 billion population globally. The detrimental effects of climate change on food security can be counteracted by broad-based economic development?particularly enhanced agricultural investment for improved land, water, and nutrient use. Improved crop, soil, and water management practices and stress-tolerant varieties that will overcome the detrimental impacts of climate change will lead to benefits like improved food security, livelihoods, and environmental security. Among the agricultural systems at greater risk of climate change are the dryland tropics, where the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) has its mandate. ICRISAT's new Strategy to 2020 lays emphasis on inclusive market-oriented development (IMOD) as a pathway out of poverty by linking farmers to markets to increase incomes, enabled through a systems perspective and purposeful partnerships. ICRISAT aims to build resilient dryland systems through its research thrust on reducing vulnerability to drought, heat, and other climate change scenarios. ICRISAT's many major milestones on its climate-responsible path have been its short-duration chickpea varieties that have enabled an expansion of the crop into tropical latitudes in Asia and Africa, sustainable soil management practices such as microdosing, conservation agriculture, and initiatives such as the Sahelian Eco-Farm and knowledge-based and people-centric entry-point activities in its community-based watersheds.Collection: Reprints Collection
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

Reprints Collection Available
Total holds: 0

It is imperative that the world's farmlands become the frontline for the battle to feed the projected 9 billion population globally. The detrimental effects of climate change on food security can be counteracted by broad-based economic development?particularly enhanced agricultural investment for improved land, water, and nutrient use. Improved crop, soil, and water management practices and stress-tolerant varieties that will overcome the detrimental impacts of climate change will lead to benefits like improved food security, livelihoods, and environmental security. Among the agricultural systems at greater risk of climate change are the dryland tropics, where the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) has its mandate. ICRISAT's new Strategy to 2020 lays emphasis on inclusive market-oriented development (IMOD) as a pathway out of poverty by linking farmers to markets to increase incomes, enabled through a systems perspective and purposeful partnerships. ICRISAT aims to build resilient dryland systems through its research thrust on reducing vulnerability to drought, heat, and other climate change scenarios. ICRISAT's many major milestones on its climate-responsible path have been its short-duration chickpea varieties that have enabled an expansion of the crop into tropical latitudes in Asia and Africa, sustainable soil management practices such as microdosing, conservation agriculture, and initiatives such as the Sahelian Eco-Farm and knowledge-based and people-centric entry-point activities in its community-based watersheds.

English

Carelia Juarez

Reprints Collection

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Monday –Friday 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org