Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Rural child labour: views of extension agents in Ethiopia

By: Murray, U.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: New York : Taylor and Francis, 2013ISSN: 1389-224X.Subject(s): Agriculture | Child labour in agriculture | Domestic work | Ethiopia | Extension agents | Gender AGROVOC | Rural girls In: Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension v. 19, no. 5, p. 505-519Summary: Purpose: Whilst children working in agriculture and domestic work is an inherent part of growing up and essential for survival, if boys and girls lose out on education they are less equipped to respond to inevitable environmental shocks and to negotiate agri-food value chains. This article investigates views of extension agents on children working.|Design/methodology/approach: One hundred and sixty-seven Ethiopian agricultural extension agents provided their views in a questionnaire on child labour in agriculture, complemented by key-informant interviews.|Findings: ?Child labour? is not easily understood as a significant problem in agriculture. Domestic work is a burden for rural girls in particular. There is a need to disaggregate the tasks that boys and girls are undertaking. Agricultural extension staff are found to be an important stakeholder group for addressing child labour in agriculture, because they are knowledgeable about the realities of rural livelihoods, observe labour practices and can suggest sensible ways to address labour demands. As agricultural productivity usually refers to annual yield per hectare, it may be timely to also consider productivity in terms of reduced child labour per hectare. Labour saving technologies are required. Awareness of children?s rights and of the hazards of child labour in agriculture is required at many levels, combined with improved political coherence on the issue.|Practical implications: Extension agents? views/suggestions confirm they are an important stakeholder group for an issue not directly within their mandate. Extension and education officials need to work together to foster the next generation of farmers, particularly focusing on rural girls.|Originality/value: This is the first study of agricultural extension agents' views on child labour in agriculture.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

Reprints Collection Available
Total holds: 0

Open Access

Purpose: Whilst children working in agriculture and domestic work is an inherent part of growing up and essential for survival, if boys and girls lose out on education they are less equipped to respond to inevitable environmental shocks and to negotiate agri-food value chains. This article investigates views of extension agents on children working.|Design/methodology/approach: One hundred and sixty-seven Ethiopian agricultural extension agents provided their views in a questionnaire on child labour in agriculture, complemented by key-informant interviews.|Findings: ?Child labour? is not easily understood as a significant problem in agriculture. Domestic work is a burden for rural girls in particular. There is a need to disaggregate the tasks that boys and girls are undertaking. Agricultural extension staff are found to be an important stakeholder group for addressing child labour in agriculture, because they are knowledgeable about the realities of rural livelihoods, observe labour practices and can suggest sensible ways to address labour demands. As agricultural productivity usually refers to annual yield per hectare, it may be timely to also consider productivity in terms of reduced child labour per hectare. Labour saving technologies are required. Awareness of children?s rights and of the hazards of child labour in agriculture is required at many levels, combined with improved political coherence on the issue.|Practical implications: Extension agents? views/suggestions confirm they are an important stakeholder group for an issue not directly within their mandate. Extension and education officials need to work together to foster the next generation of farmers, particularly focusing on rural girls.|Originality/value: This is the first study of agricultural extension agents' views on child labour in agriculture.

Text in english

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Monday –Friday 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org