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Genetics of resistance to downy mildew in Brassica oleracea and breeding towards durable disease control for UK vegetable production

By: Vicente, G.
Contributor(s): Bailey, L [coaut.] | Gunn, N.D [coaut.] | Holub, E.B [coaut.] | Pink, D.A.C [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2011Subject(s): Cauliflowers | Basal defence | Broccoli | Hyaloperonospora parasitica | Major R gene resistance | Oomycete In: Plant PathologySummary: Downy mildew resistance was previously identified from screening a Brassica oleracea collection against two standard UK isolates of Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Sources of resistance were chosen from this material and developed further in this study by generating doubled haploid (DH) and inbred lines. Seedlings from the new lines were tested for resistance to a larger collection of H. parasitica isolates collected in 2001-2002 and 2007-2008 from the main broccoli and cauliflower production regions of the UK. Three lines (derived from borecole or summer cabbage) were broadly resistant to the pathogen isolates. Three of the remaining lines exhibited strong isolate-specific resistance; several examples of weak or basal level of resistance to some isolates were observed. A new H. parasitica variant collected in 2008 was virulent in the broadly resistant lines, but was avirulent in a line with narrow specificity of resistance. The F2 and BC1 seedlings derived from outcrossing each of the three broadly resistant lines to susceptible broccoli and cauliflower lines segregated in a manner indicating that the resistance was controlled by a single dominant gene. No susceptibility was observed amongst F2 seedlings derived from intercrossing the three resistant lines, indicating that they all share the same or closely linked broad-spectrum resistance gene(s). DH lines were produced from F1 plants, and resistant plants were further backcrossed to produce broccoli and cauliflower-like lines that could be useful pre-breeding material. A combination of resistance from lines with broad and narrow specificity is recommended for controlling downy mildew in UK brassica production.Collection: Reprints Collection
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Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

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Peer-review: Yes - Open Access: Yes|http://science.thomsonreuters.com/cgi-bin/jrnlst/jlresults.cgi?PC=MASTER&ISSN=0032-0862

Downy mildew resistance was previously identified from screening a Brassica oleracea collection against two standard UK isolates of Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Sources of resistance were chosen from this material and developed further in this study by generating doubled haploid (DH) and inbred lines. Seedlings from the new lines were tested for resistance to a larger collection of H. parasitica isolates collected in 2001-2002 and 2007-2008 from the main broccoli and cauliflower production regions of the UK. Three lines (derived from borecole or summer cabbage) were broadly resistant to the pathogen isolates. Three of the remaining lines exhibited strong isolate-specific resistance; several examples of weak or basal level of resistance to some isolates were observed. A new H. parasitica variant collected in 2008 was virulent in the broadly resistant lines, but was avirulent in a line with narrow specificity of resistance. The F2 and BC1 seedlings derived from outcrossing each of the three broadly resistant lines to susceptible broccoli and cauliflower lines segregated in a manner indicating that the resistance was controlled by a single dominant gene. No susceptibility was observed amongst F2 seedlings derived from intercrossing the three resistant lines, indicating that they all share the same or closely linked broad-spectrum resistance gene(s). DH lines were produced from F1 plants, and resistant plants were further backcrossed to produce broccoli and cauliflower-like lines that could be useful pre-breeding material. A combination of resistance from lines with broad and narrow specificity is recommended for controlling downy mildew in UK brassica production.

English

Carelia Juarez

Reprints Collection

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