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Diversification into horticulture and poverty reduction: A research agenda

By: Weinberger, K.
Contributor(s): Lumpkin, T.A [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2007Subject(s): global trends | Horticulture | Poverty reduction | Research needs In: World Development v. 35, no. 8, p. 1464-1480634856Summary: Horticultural produce and processed products from the developing world are becoming increasingly popular both in domestic and in international markets. Global production and exports are rising steadily. However, yield increases have been smaller than area growth and have been negligible or even negative in the least developed countries. While experience shows that horticulture can offer good opportunities for poverty reduction because it increases income and generates employment, care must be taken that small and poor farmers are not excluded from the opportunities in these market sectors. In this article, we argue that development agencies must put more emphasis on horticultural research and development, especially in the following priority areas: genetic improvement, safe production systems, commercial seed production, postharvest facilities, and the urban/peri-urban environment.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

Reprints Collection REP-12911 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 634856
Total holds: 0

Peer-review: Yes - Open Access: Yes|http://science.thomsonreuters.com/cgi-bin/jrnlst/jlresults.cgi?PC=MASTER&ISSN=0305-750X

Horticultural produce and processed products from the developing world are becoming increasingly popular both in domestic and in international markets. Global production and exports are rising steadily. However, yield increases have been smaller than area growth and have been negligible or even negative in the least developed countries. While experience shows that horticulture can offer good opportunities for poverty reduction because it increases income and generates employment, care must be taken that small and poor farmers are not excluded from the opportunities in these market sectors. In this article, we argue that development agencies must put more emphasis on horticultural research and development, especially in the following priority areas: genetic improvement, safe production systems, commercial seed production, postharvest facilities, and the urban/peri-urban environment.

English

No CIMMYT affiliation|Elsevier

INT2837

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