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Integration of environmental, agronomic, and economic aspects of fertilizer management

By: Matson, P.A.
Contributor(s): Naylor, R [coaut.] | Ortiz-Monasterio, I [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 1998Subject(s): Application methods | Application rates | Economic analysis | Fertilization | Fertilizer application | Innovation adoption | Mexico | Research projects | Technology transfer | CIMMYT | Nitrogen fertilizers AGROVOCOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff In: Science v. 280, no. 5360, p. 112-115629053Summary: Nitrogen fertilization is a substantial source of nitrogen-containing trace gases that have both regional and global consequences, In the intensive wheat systems of Mexico, typical fertilization practices lead to extremely high fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO). In experiments, lower rates of nitrogen fertilizer, applied later in the crop cycle, reduced the loss of nitrogen without affecting yield and grain quality. Economic analyses projected this alternative practice to save 12 to 17 percent of after-tax profits, A knowledge-intensive approach to fertilizer management can substitute for higher levels of inputs, saving farmers money and reducing environmental costs.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-2370 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 629053
Total holds: 0

Peer-review: Yes - Open Access: Yes|http://science.thomsonreuters.com/cgi-bin/jrnlst/jlresults.cgi?PC=MASTER&ISSN=0036-8075

Nitrogen fertilization is a substantial source of nitrogen-containing trace gases that have both regional and global consequences, In the intensive wheat systems of Mexico, typical fertilization practices lead to extremely high fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO). In experiments, lower rates of nitrogen fertilizer, applied later in the crop cycle, reduced the loss of nitrogen without affecting yield and grain quality. Economic analyses projected this alternative practice to save 12 to 17 percent of after-tax profits, A knowledge-intensive approach to fertilizer management can substitute for higher levels of inputs, saving farmers money and reducing environmental costs.

Conservation Agriculture Program

English

0005|R99-00JOURN|AL-Wheat Program|3

INT1421

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