Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Wheel traffic placement effects on corn response under no-tillage and conventional tillage

By: Tsegaye, T.
Contributor(s): Hill, R.L [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 1996ISSN: 0890-8524.Subject(s): Alkali metals | America | Appalachian states usa | Crop husbandry | Cultivation | Developmental stages | Elements | Gramineae | Metallic elements | Nonmetals | North America | Nutrition physiology | Physiological functions | Plant developmental stages | Plant physiology Nutrition | Quality | Soil cultivation | Southern states usa | USA | Vehicle systems | Zea | Conservation tillage AGROVOC | Tillage AGROVOC | Yields AGROVOCDDC classification: 97-002039 In: Journal of production agriculture (USA). (Jan-Mar 1996). v. 9(1) p. 95-101Summary: Although previous studies on the Del-Mar-Va peninsula have indicated that vehicular wheel traffic from small scale farm equipment (< 5 tons/axle) does not result in soil conditions considered detrimental to plant growth under no-tillage (NT) and conventional tillage (CT) management, farmers are still concerned that decreased plant response and reduced crop yields may result A study was conducted from 1988 to 1991 to evaluate the effects of wined traffic placement on corn (Zea mays L.) growth, nutrient uptake, and yield response under NT and CT. The soil was a Bertie silt loam (fine, loamy, mixed, mesic Aquic Hapludult) and was somewhat poorly drained. Replicated field pots were established for NT and CT corn in which rows of corn were subjected to different wheel traffic patterns. The patterns were: wheel traffic on neither side of the row (NS), wheel traffic on one side of the row (1S), wheel traffic on both sides of the row (2S), and wheel traffic on both sides and in the center of the row (IR). Co rn plant emergence, biomass production, nutrient uptake, and yield were evaluated. The results generally indicated that NT had higher emergence rates than CT each year of the study. The NT plots also generally exhibited higher N and P levels for all growth components than the CT. In the grain tissue, NT plots had higher K levels than CT. Wheel traffic had significant effects on plant emergence 3 out of 4 yr. Wheel traffic did not have significant effects on biomass production and yield in 1988 or 1989, but did in 1990 and 1991. The IR treatment consistently exhibited reduced plant growth and yield response. It is felt that the concerns commonly expressed by farmers on the detrimental effects of wheel traffic activity may be due to plant responses observed in the end rows on the field boundaries. These end rows are exposed to wheel traffic directly in the row during planting operationsCollection: AGRIS Collection
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

AGRIS Collection 97-002039 (Browse shelf) Available
Total holds: 0

references US (DNAL S539.5.J68)

Although previous studies on the Del-Mar-Va peninsula have indicated that vehicular wheel traffic from small scale farm equipment (< 5 tons/axle) does not result in soil conditions considered detrimental to plant growth under no-tillage (NT) and conventional tillage (CT) management, farmers are still concerned that decreased plant response and reduced crop yields may result A study was conducted from 1988 to 1991 to evaluate the effects of wined traffic placement on corn (Zea mays L.) growth, nutrient uptake, and yield response under NT and CT. The soil was a Bertie silt loam (fine, loamy, mixed, mesic Aquic Hapludult) and was somewhat poorly drained. Replicated field pots were established for NT and CT corn in which rows of corn were subjected to different wheel traffic patterns. The patterns were: wheel traffic on neither side of the row (NS), wheel traffic on one side of the row (1S), wheel traffic on both sides of the row (2S), and wheel traffic on both sides and in the center of the row (IR). Co rn plant emergence, biomass production, nutrient uptake, and yield were evaluated. The results generally indicated that NT had higher emergence rates than CT each year of the study. The NT plots also generally exhibited higher N and P levels for all growth components than the CT. In the grain tissue, NT plots had higher K levels than CT. Wheel traffic had significant effects on plant emergence 3 out of 4 yr. Wheel traffic did not have significant effects on biomass production and yield in 1988 or 1989, but did in 1990 and 1991. The IR treatment consistently exhibited reduced plant growth and yield response. It is felt that the concerns commonly expressed by farmers on the detrimental effects of wheel traffic activity may be due to plant responses observed in the end rows on the field boundaries. These end rows are exposed to wheel traffic directly in the row during planting operations

English

AGRIS Collection

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.
baner

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Monday –Friday 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. If you have any question, please contact us at CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org

Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maíz y Trigo (CIMMYT) © Copyright 2015. Carretera México-Veracruz. Km. 45, El Batán, Texcoco, México, C.P. 56237.
Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org