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Grain yield of barley as affected by cropping sequence and fertilizer application in Southeastern Ethiopia

By: Asefa Taa.
Contributor(s): Amanuel Gorfu [coaut.] | Kefyalew Girma [coaut.] | Tanner, D.G [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: Kampala (Uganda) : African Crop Science Society, 1997ISSN: 2072-6589 (Online).Subject(s): Application rates | Barley | Brassica carinata | Ethiopia | Faba beans AGROVOC | Highlands | Hordeum vulgare | Plant response AGROVOC | Research projects | Soft wheat AGROVOC | Vicia faba AGROVOC | Rotational - Término tomado de AGROVOC -- Término tomado de AGROVOC | Triticum aestivum AGROVOC | Yields AGROVOC | Nitrogen fertilizers AGROVOCOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff In: African Crop Science Journal v. 5, no. 2, p. 135-146Summary: Cropping systems in the Ethiopian highlands involve rotations of cereals with grain legume and oilseed crops; the proportional allocation among crop species varies with altitude, rainfall, and soil type. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) tends to dominate in the highest altitudinal zones, while bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is more common at medium altitudes. A trial was established in 1992 at the Bekoji research site in southeastern Ethiopia to evaluate interactions among barley-based cropping sequences and annual applications of inorganic nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) fertiliser. Rotational crops included Ethiopian rapeseed (Brassica carinata), faba bean (Vicia faba), and bread wheat
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Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection Available
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Cropping systems in the Ethiopian highlands involve rotations of cereals with grain legume and oilseed crops; the proportional allocation among crop species varies with altitude, rainfall, and soil type. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) tends to dominate in the highest altitudinal zones, while bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is more common at medium altitudes. A trial was established in 1992 at the Bekoji research site in southeastern Ethiopia to evaluate interactions among barley-based cropping sequences and annual applications of inorganic nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) fertiliser. Rotational crops included Ethiopian rapeseed (Brassica carinata), faba bean (Vicia faba), and bread wheat

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TEEAL 1997

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