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Assessing the impact of new technology: three levels of analysis

By: Traxler, G.
Contributor(s): Harrington, L.W [coaut.] | Renkow, M [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 1991Subject(s): Agricultural development | Appropriate technology | Behaviour | Development aid | Farmers | Innovation adoption | Monitoring | Social Welfare | Surveying | Technical progressOnline resources: Access only for CIMMYT Staff In: Journal of Asian Farming Systems Association v. 1, no. 2, p. 227-244611987, 617827, 624969 In: Symposium on Sustainable Farming Systems in 21st Century Asia, Bangkok, Thailand611987, 617827, 624969Summary: It is ironic that fanning systems research and extension (FSRE), long accustomed lo condemning conventional agricultural research for having limited impact on farmers, is becoming increasingly vulnerable lo the lame charge. FSRE practitioners can no longer ignore questions of adoption and impact This paper discusses methods for assessing the impact of FSRE programs, with emphasis on three levels of analysis: monitoring farmer adoption of new technology; estimating economic returns lo investment in agricultural research, including FSRE; and using general equilibrium analysis lo examine the effects of widespread fanner adoption on non-adopting populations. Of these three levels, the first is fundamental. Yet even that one has been largely ignored by FSRE practitioners. The third level has never been used by FSRE practitioners, and is unlikely lo be, unless FSRE can be shown to be responsible for major changes in productivity over large areas.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-1458 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 611987
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-1458 (Browse shelf) 2 Available 617827
Article CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-1458 (Browse shelf) 3 Available 624969
Total holds: 0

Tables, graphs, references p. 25-27

It is ironic that fanning systems research and extension (FSRE), long accustomed lo condemning conventional agricultural research for having limited impact on farmers, is becoming increasingly vulnerable lo the lame charge. FSRE practitioners can no longer ignore questions of adoption and impact This paper discusses methods for assessing the impact of FSRE programs, with emphasis on three levels of analysis: monitoring farmer adoption of new technology; estimating economic returns lo investment in agricultural research, including FSRE; and using general equilibrium analysis lo examine the effects of widespread fanner adoption on non-adopting populations. Of these three levels, the first is fundamental. Yet even that one has been largely ignored by FSRE practitioners. The third level has never been used by FSRE practitioners, and is unlikely lo be, unless FSRE can be shown to be responsible for major changes in productivity over large areas.

Socioeconomics Program

English

R100ECO|EP|MIC 9966-R|3|SEP archives

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