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Maintaining maize productivity by combining organic and inorganic fertilizers in small holder farms within the Kitale region

By: Onyango, R.M.A | Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT), Mexico DF (Mexico).
Contributor(s): CIMMYT | Kamidi, M. K [coaut.] | Kiiya, W. W [coaut.] | Mwangi, T. K [coaut.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookAnalytics: Show analyticsPublisher: Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) CIMMYT|EARO : 1999Description: p. 242-246.ISBN: 92-9146-065-6.Subject(s): Dry farming | Fertilizer application | Fertilizers | Inorganic fertilizers | Kenya | Maize | Plant production | Small farms | Soil management | Trials | CIMMYT | Zea mays AGROVOC | Soil fertility AGROVOCDDC classification: 633.15 Summary: Maize in Kenya is a low productivity crop; the result of continuous cropping on small land holdings. A Soil Management Project (SMP) initiated three years ago to identify low cost sustainable options realised that more-intensive strategies for soil fertility management are needed to guarantee sustainable maize production in the future. Earlier recommendations of using inorganic fertilizer have had their shortcomings. Due to their ever-increasing cost, farmers are applying very low rates. The aim of the project was to educate farmers on the importance of soil fertility in crop production with special emphasis on maize, Farmers were exposed to different types and uses of locally available agricultural by products that enriched soils, ranging from farmyard manures (FYM) to locally prepared composts. A multidisciplinary team of officers from the Environmental Action Team (a Non Governmental Organisation), extension staff from the Ministry of Agriculture Livestock Development and Marketing (MOALD&M), and researchers from Kenya Agriculture Research Institute (KARI) educated farmers through a series of participatory workshops beginning in 1995. Demonstrations were held in 1995 on methods of making high quality compost, and collection and preservation of FYM. During the same year, on farm trials using pure forms of these organic amendments and combinations with inorganic fertilizer were compared to determine both their effects on maize yield and on soil properties. The treatments were compared for three years. Soil tests on farms where experiments were conducted indicated phosphorus and nitrogen deficiencies. Tests also confirmed that these amendments were potentially high in pH, available phosphorus (P) and organic carbon. The highest rates of compost or FYM (10 t/ha) gave yields that were similar but significantly higher than the control. Where there were mixtures of organic and inorganic amendments on a half/half basis the yield was not significantly different from the yields of maize with recommended fertilizer rates (60 P205 and 60 N Kg/ha). This trend was observed in the second and third years. These mixtures of locally available organic by-products and expensive inorganic inputs will be one way to economically maintain maize yields and the soil environment in the future.Collection: CIMMYT Publications Collection
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Conference proceedings CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Publications Collection 633.15 EAS No. 6 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 1R649283
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Maize in Kenya is a low productivity crop; the result of continuous cropping on small land holdings. A Soil Management Project (SMP) initiated three years ago to identify low cost sustainable options realised that more-intensive strategies for soil fertility management are needed to guarantee sustainable maize production in the future. Earlier recommendations of using inorganic fertilizer have had their shortcomings. Due to their ever-increasing cost, farmers are applying very low rates. The aim of the project was to educate farmers on the importance of soil fertility in crop production with special emphasis on maize, Farmers were exposed to different types and uses of locally available agricultural by products that enriched soils, ranging from farmyard manures (FYM) to locally prepared composts. A multidisciplinary team of officers from the Environmental Action Team (a Non Governmental Organisation), extension staff from the Ministry of Agriculture Livestock Development and Marketing (MOALD&M), and researchers from Kenya Agriculture Research Institute (KARI) educated farmers through a series of participatory workshops beginning in 1995. Demonstrations were held in 1995 on methods of making high quality compost, and collection and preservation of FYM. During the same year, on farm trials using pure forms of these organic amendments and combinations with inorganic fertilizer were compared to determine both their effects on maize yield and on soil properties. The treatments were compared for three years. Soil tests on farms where experiments were conducted indicated phosphorus and nitrogen deficiencies. Tests also confirmed that these amendments were potentially high in pH, available phosphorus (P) and organic carbon. The highest rates of compost or FYM (10 t/ha) gave yields that were similar but significantly higher than the control. Where there were mixtures of organic and inorganic amendments on a half/half basis the yield was not significantly different from the yields of maize with recommended fertilizer rates (60 P205 and 60 N Kg/ha). This trend was observed in the second and third years. These mixtures of locally available organic by-products and expensive inorganic inputs will be one way to economically maintain maize yields and the soil environment in the future.

English

0103|AL-Maize Program|AGRIS 0102|AJ

CIMMYT Publications Collection

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