Diversifying conservation agriculture and conventional tillage cropping systems to improve the wellbeing of smallholder farmers in Malawi (Record no. 60033)

000 -LEADER
fixed length control field 00595nab|a22002177a|4500
001 - CONTROL NUMBER
control field 60033
003 - CONTROL NUMBER IDENTIFIER
control field MX-TxCIM
005 - DATE AND TIME OF LATEST TRANSACTION
control field 20190611213309.0
008 - FIXED-LENGTH DATA ELEMENTS--GENERAL INFORMATION
fixed length control field 190129s2019||||xxk|||p|op||||00||0|eng|d
024 8# - OTHER STANDARD IDENTIFIER
Standard number or code https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agsy.2019.01.004
040 ## - CATALOGING SOURCE
Original cataloging agency MX-TxCIM
041 ## - LANGUAGE CODE
Language code of text/sound track or separate title eng
100 1# - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name TerAvest, D.
9 (RLIN) 1674
245 1# - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Diversifying conservation agriculture and conventional tillage cropping systems to improve the wellbeing of smallholder farmers in Malawi
260 ## - PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC. (IMPRINT)
Place of publication, distribution, etc. United Kingdom :
Name of publisher, distributor, etc. Elsevier,
Date of publication, distribution, etc. 2019.
500 ## - GENERAL NOTE
General note Peer review
520 ## - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc. Food production and the wellbeing of smallholder farmers are constrained by their limited financial resources, poor market access, and inadequate institutional support in southern and eastern Africa. Conservation agriculture (CA)?minimal soil disturbance, year-round ground cover, and diverse crop rotations?is being promoted to sustainably boost crop production, increase household income, and diversify diets for better nutrition. In this study, three cropping systems?continuous no-till maize, CA rotation, and conventional tillage rotation?were established on smallholder farms in the Nkhotakota and Dowa districts, two distinct agroecological zones in Malawi. Diverse three-year crop rotations in CA and conventional tillage systems included the alternative food crops sweet potato and cassava and the grain legumes common bean, soybean, cowpea, and pigeonpea. The effects of cropping system on labor use and financial returns, which served as a rough indicator of feasibility and farmer wellbeing, were analyzed for three years from 2011 to 2014. Over the three years of the study, continuous no-till maize produced the greatest gross and net revenues, despite also having greater production costs than CA and conventional systems. Although substantially less profitable than continuous no-till maize, the diversified CA and conventional tillage rotations were profitable for smallholder farmers, partially due to lower production costs. Sensitivity analysis was used to test the robustness of each cropping system under varying labor, input, and output price scenarios. Altering farmgate prices had the greatest impact on profitability, regardless of the crop grown. The input and output prices for maize were stable over the course of the study so that continuous no-till maize was the most robust cropping system. In contrast, high input cost and output price variability for alternative crops increased risk compared to maize, which may reduce their appeal to smallholder farmers. Reducing the risk of conservation agriculture rotations could provide smallholder farmers with more diversified diets and greater ecosystem services, such as greater rainwater infiltration and storage to withstand dry spells. Based on the results of this study, policies that reduce input price variability and increase farmgate prices of alternative food crops would have the greatest impact on the adoption of diverse crop rotations in Malawi.
526 ## - STUDY PROGRAM INFORMATION NOTE
Program name Maize CRP
Maize Flagship Projects FP1 - Sustainable intensification of maize-based farming systems
546 ## - LANGUAGE NOTE
Language note Text in English
650 #7 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Source of heading or term AGROVOC
9 (RLIN) 2619
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Conservation agriculture
650 #7 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Source of heading or term AGROVOC
9 (RLIN) 1068
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Cropping systems
651 #7 - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--GEOGRAPHIC NAME
9 (RLIN) 1319
Geographic name Malawi
Miscellaneous information AGROVOC
700 1# - ADDED ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Wandschneider, P.R.
9 (RLIN) 8566
700 1# - ADDED ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Thierfelder, C.
Field link and sequence number INT2939
9 (RLIN) 877
Miscellaneous information Sustainable Intensification Program
700 1# - ADDED ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Reganold, J.P.
9 (RLIN) 1676
773 0# - HOST ITEM ENTRY
Title Agricultural Systems
Related parts v. 171, p. 23-35
International Standard Serial Number 0308-521X
Record control number 444466
856 4# - ELECTRONIC LOCATION AND ACCESS
Uniform Resource Identifier http://46.20.115.203/download/cis/60033.pdf
Link text Access only for CIMMYT Staff
942 ## - ADDED ENTRY ELEMENTS (KOHA)
Koha item type Article
Source of classification or shelving scheme
Holdings
Withdrawn status Lost status Source of classification or shelving scheme Damaged status Not for loan Collection code Permanent Location Current Location Date acquired Date last seen Price effective from Koha item type
  Not Lost       CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library 2019-01-29 2019-01-29 2019-01-29 Article
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Lunes –Viernes 9:00 am. 17:00 pm. Si tiene cualquier pregunta, contáctenos a CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org