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Breeding high yielding micronutrient-rich wheat varieties with resistance to rusts

by Velu, G; Huerta-Espino, J; Singh, R.P; Bhavani, S; Yuanfeng Hao; Autrique, E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2013Description: p. 17.Summary: Dietary deficiency of essential micronutrients such as zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) is common in humans, especially in countries highly dependent on cereal-based diets. Wheat, with over 650 million tonnes of annual production, contributes 28% of the world?s dietary energy. Therefore genetic biofortification to improve Zn and Fe in bread wheat could greatly reduce micronutrient malnutrition. A targeted breeding program was initiated at CIMMYT in 2006 to develop wheat germplasm with an 8 ppm increase in Zn over the mean 25 ppm level in the widely grown varieties. These must also be competitive in yield and resistant to rusts, including Pgt race Ug99 and derivatives. High Zn-containing advanced lines developed by using high yielding, rust resistant parents were tested at KARI-Njoro, Kenya, for Ug99 resistance. Of the 200 lines screened during the 2012 off- and main-seasons, about 10 and 45% of entries had <10 and 20% stem rust severities, respectively, indicating good prospects of identifying candidate lines with acceptable levels of resistance to Ug99. Candidate lines with more than 75% of the Zn target level and better resistance to rusts are currently under test in large scale multi-location trials in India and Pakistan. The first release of biofortified wheat is expected in India by 2014-15Collection: CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection
List(s) this item appears in: Ug99
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Procedings
CIMMYT Knowledge Center: John Woolston Library

Lic. Jose Juan Caballero Flores

 

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection CIS-7286 (Browse shelf) Available
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Abstract only

Dietary deficiency of essential micronutrients such as zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) is common in humans, especially in countries highly dependent on cereal-based diets. Wheat, with over 650 million tonnes of annual production, contributes 28% of the world?s dietary energy. Therefore genetic biofortification to improve Zn and Fe in bread wheat could greatly reduce micronutrient malnutrition. A targeted breeding program was initiated at CIMMYT in 2006 to develop wheat germplasm with an 8 ppm increase in Zn over the mean 25 ppm level in the widely grown varieties. These must also be competitive in yield and resistant to rusts, including Pgt race Ug99 and derivatives. High Zn-containing advanced lines developed by using high yielding, rust resistant parents were tested at KARI-Njoro, Kenya, for Ug99 resistance. Of the 200 lines screened during the 2012 off- and main-seasons, about 10 and 45% of entries had <10 and 20% stem rust severities, respectively, indicating good prospects of identifying candidate lines with acceptable levels of resistance to Ug99. Candidate lines with more than 75% of the Zn target level and better resistance to rusts are currently under test in large scale multi-location trials in India and Pakistan. The first release of biofortified wheat is expected in India by 2014-15

Global Wheat Program

English

Lucia Segura

INT0610|INT3329|N1203511|INT2843

CIMMYT Staff Publications Collection

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